Clark Gregg

Trust Me Clark Gregg

Clark Gregg recently wrote, directed and starred in an indie called Trust Me, and instead of asking one question about it before moving on to nine questions about Marvel movies, we took the opportunity to dig deep into what’s clearly a very personal work. In the movie he plays a former child actor turned child actor agent (have fun, Psych majors) who discovers an amazingly gifted young actress who might join a major franchise and bring him the success he’s always dreamed of. Spoiler alert: Loki never shows up. Plus, Geoff and I answer your screenwriting questions and then discuss some bizarre real-life things that would make amazing movies. Follow the show (@brokenprojector), Geoff (@drgmlatulippe) and Scott (@scottmbeggs) on Twitter for more on a daily basis. Please review us on iTunes Download Episode #60 Directly Or subscribe Through iTunes

read more...

Starz Digital Media

Howard (Clark Gregg) is a Hollywood agent handling child talent, but his efforts to find new clients are constantly undermined by his nemesis, the smoother and flashier Aldo (Sam Rockwell). Once a childhood actor himself, Howard believes he has something different to offer these vulnerable kids. He’s been where they are and feels he’s that much closer to them on a personal level. When Howard meets the self-admitted “precocious” young actress, Lydia (Saxon Sharbino), he knows she’s destined to be a hot commodity. She’s soon pursued for a role in a big YA adaptation — think Twilight, Divergent, Mortal Instruments — and at least for the moment it looks like Howard’s luck is on the upswing. Lydia has talent and actually seems to care about Howard enough not to quickly replace him with a better agent, but her father Ray (Paul Sparks) has other ideas.

read more...

CLARK GREGG, CHLOE BENNET, MING-NA WEN

“The Well” was the most anticipated episode of Agents of SHIELD since the pilot, with Star Trek: TNG actor Jonathan Frakes behind the camera, guest star Peter MacNicol, and, of course, the cross-promotion with Thor 2. Fortunately for ABC and the series’ steadily falling ratings, “The Well” was also the SHIELD‘s best hour by a large margin. The Thor 2 insertions, while unnecessary, didn’t stick out like a sore thumb, and actually worked with the main story of Dr. Elliot Randolph’s (MacNicol) Asgardian identity. The B-story of Ward’s Tragic Past was more of a promise than the fulfillment of one, but it also led to the nice surprise of him taking up Melinda’s invitation for some sexual healing. (Please don’t let this be a fake-out.) All in all, “The Well” fired on all cylinders: character development, plot, humor, and illustrating the ways crazy people become even crazier once they discover the existence of supernatural beings. Coulson, too, returned from the naive robot version of himself in last week’s “The Hub” to reclaim his role as every white-bread middle-aged dude’s slightly more badass version of himself. Through his wits, his famous friends (he’s such a name-dropper), and his apparent obsession with expensive pens, Coulson saved the day by performing some improvisational heart surgery.

read more...

The Hub

Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. is the kind of show you’d suspect of insulting your intelligence, except you’re pretty sure it’s just that dumb. “The Hub” is  a perfect example of the writers thinking they’re pulling one over us, except they have all the subtlety of Godzilla in Tokyo. “Trust the system.” “I like following the rules and doing what’s expected of me.” “The people who put these ops together are the best of the best.” That Coulson and Company would turn against their Big Brother org (workplace morale must be so low there) was obvious from the episode’s first few minutes — hell, from the show’s first couple of episodes. The question is, what took them so long? Lots of serialized shows use a first season mystery to keep viewers invested in new characters. Every serial killer show is guilty of this. Mad Men did this with Don Draper’s secret past, and Homeland with the question of Brody’s allegiances. Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. is obviously trying to do this with Coulson’s death and the identities of Skye’s parents — which, based on last night, seem not to be Coulson and the Cavalry anymore. But as with so many things on this show, the pacing is off and the characters aren’t well-defined enough for us to care. It all feels inconsequential. Coulson may have some issues with his employers when he finally learns what happened to him during the “Battle of New York,” but he’s still going to be a part of S.H.I.E.L.D. (He definitely isn’t ready to give up that sweet jet.) And […]

read more...

CHLOE BENNET

I suppose there was always only the slimmest of chances that Agents of SHIELD would give a fair shake to the freedom of information movement. After all, disruptive, potentially anarchic institutions like Wikileaks and Anonymous strike fear into the hearts of governments and giant corporations (like Disney, which owns Marvel and ABC). I’m no apologist for self-righteous hackers, but I’d hoped that the show would tease out that particular ethical ambiguity of SHIELD, particularly its extensive surveillance activities and extralegal existence, a little longer, if only to give the audience a little intellectual meat to chew on. Sadly, “Girl in the Flower Dress” was a bare-bones affair, as well as a big drop-off in quality after last week’s high benchmark. It was also a hit job on the free information movement, half-heartedly represented by Miles, a selfish goon who sells his hacking wares for a measly million bucks, as well as a weepy Skye who confesses to Coulson, “It’s [why] I learned to crack systems, why I joined the Rising Tide. To find any details I could about my parents.” By reducing Miles and Skye’s motivations for hacking to greedy and/or personal reasons, the show deprives from the Wikileakers of the world any philosophical or ethical authority — the effect of which is to take the show further from a recognizable human world toward a good-versus-bad cardboard universe.

read more...

PASCALE ARMAND, MING-NA WEN

Agents of SHIELD finally delivers its first solid episode, courtesy of writer Jeffrey Bell, who cut his teeth on The X-Files and Angel. Though it concerned a former SHIELD agent, “Eye-Spy” is also the first episode that feels far enough removed from the ins and outs of the superhero world that it could conceivably take place in any number of fictional universes, or even ours. (On The X-Files, Mulder would have tried to sell Scully on the sixth-sense angle before eventually abandoning it himself; on Angel, a harder-hearted sidekick like Wesley or Gunn would have tried to talk their redemption-loving vampire-friend from offering Akela a second chance.) Agents of SHIELD set out to tell human-scale stories in a world full of super-powered beings. The series’ first three episodes directly tackled that idea, but the contours of this world are still so amorphous that the characters seem to exist in a plot-convenient vacuum. “Eye-Spy” grounded the characters in a more recognizable universe by hewing the A-plot closer to sci-fi than fantasy and setting down a rule: ESP doesn’t exist. That world-building tidbit is accompanied by a few more details about the show’s mythology: Coulson used to be a jerk-boss and may have received a personality transplant during/after his near-death encounter, Melinda May is far from the only traumatized spy who’s had to retire from the field, an eye-exploiting mastermind is still lurking out there somewhere. At last, the show feels like it has a history.

read more...

Agents of SHIELD The Asset

There’s an old theory by the German philosopher G.W.F. Hegel that I’ve always been fond of: tragedy doesn’t arise from a battle between good versus evil, but from good versus good. That wrenching feeling the audience experiences having to choose between two noble actions is essential to the tragic. Though the end of “The Asset” wasn’t framed as a particularly tragic one, Coulson and Hall’s (Ian Hart) debate between the immediate versus the future-oriented plans to neutralize gravitonium lends credence to the power of Hegel’s definition. Hall, taking the long view, wanted to sink the island of Malta, along with everyone on it, so that the potent element would be out of reach, and thus couldn’t be exploited. But Coulson (seemingly) destroyed Hall to save himself and his team, opting to contain the gravitonium (ugh, that name) and lock it away forever in a vault. Which, in a superhero universe, means twiddling one’s thumbs until the villain breaks out of his cage or one of his allies launches a rescue mission to retrieve him at some future date. (Also, I know SHIELD doesn’t yet know that Hall is still alive, but how do prisoners in glass cages go to the bathroom? Do the guards just politely look away?)

read more...

Agents of SHIELD 084

I’m willing to be patient with Joss Whedon’s shows. The first seasons of Buffy, Angel, and Dollhouse were each series’ worst. (Firefly, of course, only had the one season.) But Whedon’s intended pilots for his two most recent shows, Firefly and Dollhouse, were confident introductions to characters and a universe that we were joining in medias res, not still being sketched out from scratch. Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.‘s second episode, however, taught me to lower my expectations for this series. Written by Jed Whedon, Maurissa Tancharoen, and Jeffrey Bell, “0-8-4″ was nothing short of embarrassing — from the hammy, cliched dialogue and the obvious plot twists to the forced, programmatic story arc and the paper-thin, never-not-yammering characters. The one improvement from the pilot is that the show looks slightly less cheap; unlike last week’s installment, this episode actually seemed to have a budget. (What is it about Whedon’s shows that they all have that bargain-basement look?)

read more...

I can’t be the only one stricken with flashbacks to the 90s by the Agents of SHIELD pilot. When gruff G-man Grant Ward (Brett Dalton) self-seriously intones, “We protect people from the news they aren’t ready to hear,” I half-wondered whether he would grow up to be the Cigarette-Smoking Man in The X-Files. SHIELD dredges up the same debates between secretiveness, effectiveness, and safety on the one hand, and transparency and freedom on the other, that its paranoia-fueled predecessor fostered and thrived in. Those debates, which are more topical than ever, are framed in a whole new way, though: it’s the “good guys” who justify cover-ups and their antagonist, a bouncy hacker named Skye (Chloe Bennet), who fights for exposure. More than anything else, the pilot of Agents of SHIELD is a mission statement: there’s a battle between “the truth” versus “world peace.” (We can hash out in the comments how necessary or artificial this dichotomy is; I sure hope the show will address it at some point.) Also borrowed from The X-Files is a fear of government omnipotence and omniscience. Skye’s broadcasted questions — “How will you come at us? From the air? From the ground? How will you silence us this time?” — are legitimately scary, though the goofy-serious delivery softens the impact. Perhaps even more creepy, though, is SHIELD’s obsession with surveillance and identification, as when Mike (J. August Richards) is categorized as “an unregistered gifted.” And there are layers of secrets within SHIELD itself: though Agent Coulson (Clark Gregg) is the leader of his team, he himself suffers from […]

read more...

Agents of SHIELD

Footage being released online a day after a panel is one thing. The entire panel, in a way that appears to be sanctioned and not done on someone’s flip phone camera, is another thing entirely. That’s what we have with this version of the Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. panel that took place yesterday at Comic-Con. Thanks to the folks at Emergency Awesome, we’ve got a great look at the entire panel, save for the pilot that was shown. Get a look at what Joss Whedon, Clark Gregg, Ming-Na and others had to say about the upcoming ABC show.

read more...

SHIELD-cast

It was just last May when we got our first look at genre TV legend Joss Whedon’s take on the Marvel Universe via his blockbuster feature The Avengers, and that look was good. It was good indeed. But The Avengers was so well-loved that the wait for another Whedon and Marvel team-up has begun to feel endless already. The good news is that we don’t have to wait until The Avengers 2 in 2015 to get another taste of Whedon handling superhero stuff though, because Marvel also put him in charge of putting together their upcoming primetime network television drama, Marvel’s Agents of SHIELD. And still, while Whedon getting a chance to develop another TV show is dream come true enough for fans of things like Buffy and Firefly, and the fact that this new show will give us a chance to see Whedon dabbling in the Avengers universe again in 2013 is added icing on the cake, Marvel and the network who’s going to be airing Agents of SHIELD, ABC, have been kind of jerking us around when it comes to telling us when the show is actually going to premiere. Here we are all jittery and agitated, looking for another fix, and all they’ve given us is the generic promise of “coming this fall!” Thankfully for our sanity, with the release of ABC’s new fall schedule, the premiere date for Whedon’s new show has finally been confirmed.

read more...

shield01

Nobody was surprised to learn this week that ABC officially picked up Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D., the TV series spun-off from the Avengers movie franchise. After all, it’s a Disney-owned property and the network is also a Disney-owned company. And, well, it’s a tie-in to some of the highest grossing films of all time. Even if Iron Man 3 had somehow been a box office disappointment (fat chance), the main source of the series is last year’s enormously successful The Avengers. As we learned last fall, the popular character Agent Phil Coulson (Clark Gregg) would even be the lead, meaning he somehow didn’t actually die at the hands of Loki in that movie. Within days of the confirmed pick up for a full season of Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D., ABC has now unveiled the first look with a teaser trailer that premiered on the air during prime time this evening. Coulson is definitely at the center of the thing (marketing hashtag is #coulsonlives) as head of an elite yet not super powered team of agents who investigate cases involving the “strange” and “unknown,” stuff that hasn’t been classified by the agency yet. Sounds like an action-packed mix of X-Files and Heroes. It kinda looks more like the (best of the) latter in this promo, which you can watch after the jump.

read more...

MV5BMTU2MjE3MDU4OV5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTcwMjE0MDQzOQ@@._V1._SX640_SY360_

Clark Gregg’s 2008 Choke may be the lesser known of the cinematic world’s big screen Chuck Palahniuk adaptations (it is, after all, hard to compete with names like Fincher, Pitt, and Norton), but the multi-hyphenate’s directorial debut adeptly translated the author’s trademark black humor to the screen without a hitch. For his second feature, Gregg again goes in for funny stuff with a truly dark edge and, for at least its first half, Trust Me is more brutally and bruisingly amusing than just about any other current comedy around. But Gregg’s stellar first half ends with one hell of an abrupt, tone-changing twist, and he’s never able to fully reconcile his dark humor with true darkness. Trust Me takes its audience inside the twisted world of dealmaking amongst Hollywood elite – specifically, the twisted world of dealmaking amongst Hollywood elite trying to capitalize on the talent and ability of would-be child stars. Gregg is still interested in trafficking in regular guys with extreme problems – while his Choke centered on Sam Rockwell’s otherwise-average-beyond-that-crushing-sex-addiction Victor, Trust Me focuses on Gregg’s Howard, a sad sack Hollywood agent trying to find the next big kid thing. It’s not easy and it’s not fun and Howard’s particular career path seems like the most weirdly soul-crushing career path imaginable. But Gregg’s Howard doesn’t know any better and he doesn’t know anything else – he’s been in the game since he was just six years old, back when he was a child actor himself, and it’s […]

read more...

Agent Phil Coulson

If you’ve been wearing a black armband in tribute to Agent Phil Coulson since The Avengers opened last May, it’s time to rip the thing off, because you’ve been mourning a decoy. Well, we can ramp up the theory that we saw a Life Model Decoy stabbed to death by Loki (Tom Hiddleston) in the movie, but we’ll have to wait for the S.H.I.E.L.D. television series to know just how the character survived. Apologies to anyone who hasn’t already seen The Avengers (what’s wrong with you?) and has now been spoiled that Coulson is killed off, but now he’s alive again so I guess it doesn’t matter. At the New York Comic Con Marvel television panel today, actor Clark Gregg hit the stage and then was joined via video by Avengers writer/director Joss Whedon and Marvel Studios head Kevin Feige for the announcement that Gregg will reprise his franchise-connecting role as the lead on the show.

read more...

Sam Rockwell and Clark Gregg

The year 2008 must have been a strange one for Clark Gregg, as that year marked the multi-hyphenate’s big break into the Marvel Universe with the debut of his role as Agent Coulson in Iron Man. Since then, Gregg has gone on to co-star in other Marvel properties Iron Man 2, Thor, and The Avengers, along with taking center stage in two of Marvel’s “One-Shot” short films. And while that success has been quite well-deserved, it does come with a footnote, because 2008 was also the year that Gregg’s directorial debut, Choke (from the Chuck Palahniuk novel of the same name), hit screens. The Sam Rockwell-starring film bowed at the Sundance Film Festival, earning a Grand Jury Prize, Dramatic nod for Gregg and a Special Jury Prize, Dramatic for his cast (which also included Anjelica Huston, a still-emerging Kelly Macdonald, and Brad William Henke), but it went on to earn less than $4m in worldwide release. Fight Club this was not. And Gregg hasn’t written or directed a film since – which is a shame, because Choke is nothing short of excellent and exuberant and insane and true to the spirit of Palahniuk’s work and complete with some wonderfully oddball performances). In short, we’ve been waiting for a new Gregg film ever since. And now we’re getting one.

read more...

What can one truly say about Shakespeare? He’s a writer whose work has survived centuries of history, and his stories are still being adapted, both directly and indirectly. While his dramatic work is what’s most delved into by filmmakers, his comedies are what’s most fascinating. The plot of Much Ado About Nothing centers on Don Pedro (Reed Diamond) serving as matchmaker to a few lovers in waiting. Pedro’s job involves matching not only the compliant, Hero (Jillian Morgese) and Claudio (Fran Kranz), but also the not so compliant, Beatrice (Amy Acker) and Benedick (Alexis Denisof). He sees what many do not and with the use of a few simple tricks to help push each couple in the right direction, he’s able to create a scenario in which love finds its way. Not focused on depth, Joss Whedon‘s take offers comedy gag after gag, and there’s barely any time when a joke doesn’t land perfectly. It helps to have the likes of Nathan Fillion, Clark Gregg, Denisof and Kranz in your cast. The actor spotlight begins early in the film, where a character calls for music, they turn to the iPod and Gregg starts swaying – creating an inextricably funny moment solely from his expression intertwined with his movement. So many comedies are unable to have more than a handful of memorable moments like this, but Much Ado About Nothing has dozens.

read more...

The To Do List Red Band Trailer

A movie about Aubrey Plaza giving out hand jobs, under any other name, would be just as sweet. So it’s with great anticipation that we’ve been awaiting Funny or Die vet Maggie Carey’s debut directorial effort The To Do List. The good news is, today that wait got a little bit easier, because not only has CBS Films released a red band trailer for the film, but they’ve also revealed that it will be this Valentine’s Day (February 14) when we finally get to take in this story of a virginal nerd who tries to systematically experience all the sex acts she missed out on in high school before entering college. So, based on this first teaser, does it look like The To Do List will live up to the lofty expectations that its premise creates? Maybe. Honestly, it looks a little low rent, like we’re looking at a trailer for a series of web short rather than a feature film, and while there are some amusing moments in this 90 seconds of clips, there aren’t really any of the big belly laughs that one would expect from a raunchy comedy.

read more...

We normally reserve 10 & 5 posts for big movies that are familiar to the masses, but once in a while it’s good to shine a light on a low profile indie film. This is not that time though, so instead we’re taking a look at the movie with the biggest opening weekend in history. Joss Whedon‘s entertaining as hell blockbuster, The Avengers, has already earned a rare A- grade from us (read Cole Abaius’ review), but Robert Fure and Rob Hunter wanted to take a more detailed view complete with potential and actual spoilers. Warning: There are major spoilers below. Major spoilers. You’ve now been warned about the major spoilers.

read more...

What is Movie News After Dark? It’s a nightly column that serves at the pleasure of the internet’s biggest film nerds. Currently those nerds are waiting with baited breath for the release of The Avengers. So why wouldn’t we turn a big, shiny lens toward Joss Whedon’s summer kick-off event film? Okay, lets do that… Now that The Avengers has already earned $260.5M overseas, it’s time for it to take over Movie News After Dark. As if it hasn’t been creeping its way in already. Tonight’s edition of the beloved movie news round-up column isn’t 100% populated by Avengers news, but it’s close enough. And it’s only Wednesday. We begin above with a shot from the film in question, featuring Thor (Chris Hemsworth) and Captain America (Chris Evans) in the midst of battle. Needless to say, this all has me yearning to see the film again. It’s quite fun.

read more...

The Avengers the film needs no introduction, and that’s mainly because The Avengers themselves need no introduction. A dream team of superheroes and superallies, The Avengers first appeared in the Marvel universe in 1963, so for fans of the mighty band of heroes, a big screen cinematic adaptation that would do justice to the justice-doers has been a long-held wish. With Marvel Studios churning out blockbusters for eventual Avengers like Iron Man, Thor, Captain America, and The Hulk in recent years, it was only a matter of time before that wish was granted and the heroes united for one massive film outing. It goes without saying that Joss Whedon‘s The Avengers is already a big hit here at FSR (our own Cole Abaius called it “Marvel’s mightiest movie” in his review), and we’re all anxious to see what movie-going audiences think of it. To whet your palate for the inevitable Avengers bonanza, here are 12 things that we learned at The Avengers press conference (spoiler-free if you’ve seen a trailer or two!). The event featured a massive gathering of Avengers and pals, including Robert Downey Jr. (Iron Man/Tony Stark), Chris Hemwsorth (Thor), Chris Evans (Captain America/Steve Rogers), Mark Ruffalo (The Hulk/Bruce Banner), Samuel L. Jackson (Nick Fury), Kevin Feige (Marvel President), Jeremy Renner (Hawkeye/Clint Barton),Tom Hiddleston (Loki), Clark Gregg (Agent Coulson), Cobie Smulders (Agent Maria Hill), and Joss Whedon (writer and director). Check it out after the break!

read more...
NEXT PAGE  
Twitter button
Facebook button
Google+ button
RSS feed

published: 12.18.2014
C-
published: 12.17.2014
B+
published: 12.15.2014
B
published: 12.12.2014
D+


Some movie websites serve the consumer. Some serve the industry. At Film School Rejects, we serve at the pleasure of the connoisseur. We provide the best reviews, interviews and features to millions of dedicated movie fans who know what they love and love what they know. Because we, like you, simply love the art of the moving picture.
Fantastic Fest 2014
6 Filmmaking Tips: James Gunn
Got a Tip? Send it here:
editors@filmschoolrejects.com
Publisher:
Neil Miller
Managing Editor:
Scott Beggs
Associate Editors:
Rob Hunter
Kate Erbland
Christopher Campbell
All Rights Reserved © 2006-2014 Reject Media, LLC | Privacy Policy | Design & Development by Face3