Junkfood Cinema

Junkfood Cinema Podcast

Junkfood Cinema. You’ve heard plenty of cyber banter on the “true classics,” on what’s popular in film now, and about projections for movies yet-to-come. Junkfood Cinema is a shame-free celebration of those films that have managed to slip through the cracks of time; the lost children of the medium.

These are films relegated to mainstream obscurity, and most even erroneously dubbed as “terrible.” To ravenous genre consumers like Brian Salisbury and screenwriter/novelist C. Robert Cargill, there is nothing more satisfying than gorging on cult and exploitation gems with the mad gluttony of a pre-dawn fourth meal.

The Last Man on Earth

Last weekend, Cargill and I did something we had never done before. (Watch good movies?) QUIET YOU! The good folks at Minneapolis’ CONvergence foolishly agreed to host the first ever live broadcast of Junkfood Cinema! Despite the ‘cast falling on July 4th, we sashayed around expectation and opted not to discuss Independence Day. Instead, we devoted our main topic to the late, great Richard Matheson. We chat about our favorite films based on his works as well as break down all three filmic versions of I Am Legend. We finish things off with a few questions from the audience, (people actually showed up, crazy right?), which leads to a nearly orgasmic conversation about the Thai actioner Born To Fight. Seriously, that film makes Gymkata look like…Gym…nada. Burn. If you weren’t able to listen live, please enjoy this cached audio of Junkfood Cinema Live! You should follow Brian (@Briguysalisbury), Cargill (@Massawyrm), and the show (@Junkfoodcinema). Download Episode #18 Directly

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Under Siege

This week, Cargill and I are walking on, walking on broken glass. That is to say we are treading dangerously over the broken shards of Die Hard ripoffs. John McClane not only made trouble for Hans Gruber, he distinctly altered the course of action cinema for years to follow. Brian gives his Slop 10 of “Die Hardlies” while Cargill…well…grimaces mostly. You may or may not believe which films make the cut. You should follow Brian (@Briguysalisbury), Cargill (@Massawyrm), and the show (@Junkfoodcinema). Download Episode #17 Directly

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Elvis Presley King Creole

This week, as Cargill roams the Himalayas in search of more discarded VHS copies of Skatetown USA, I am joined by FSR’s own Culture Warrior and soon-to-be-PhD Landon Palmer for a discussion of the deep-fried film oeuvre of The King himself. Almost-Dr. Palmer is definitely taking care of business as he breaks down how the shifts in Elvis Presley‘s onscreen performances mirror the shifts in rock-n-roll culture through the 50s and 60s. For my part, I go all fainting Bobby soxer over my love for King Creole and reveal how many times I’ve been to Graceland. All this, plus the reveal of which Elvis movie was intended to feature a talking camel. A little less conversation, Mr. Presley? Oh no, I think we need a lot LOT more. You should follow Brian (@Briguysalisbury), Landon (@landonspeak), and the show (@Junkfoodcinema). Download Episode #16 Directly

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Overdrive Movie Truck

Fasten your safety belts, junkies, because this week’s episode…wait, no. Don’t fasten the seat belt at all. Get out of that car immediately! It’s sentient, it’ll destroy you! IT’S WHAT EVIL DRIVES!!! Luckily, what drives me and Cargill is our love for strange filmic subgenres, not the least of which being the fuel-injected, tire-squealing landscape of killer car flicks. On this week’s episode, we veer into oncoming excellence; popping the hood on five of our favorite vicious vehicles from cinema past. We also park the show momentarily to stare aghast at the sheer audacity of Stephen King’s incendiary remarks during the Maximum Overdrive trailer. Don’t idle, you’ve got the green light to download another high octane edition of Junkfood Cinema.

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Return to Horror High Clooney

This week, Cargill and I go outside the Actor’s Studio to examine the early horror films of one Mr. George Clooney, or as you may now know him: God-King of Hollywood. Back in the glory days, the all-or-nothing days, before bestriding the narrow world like a colossus, Clooney was a struggling actor same as countless others, forced to take roles in b-horror outings in order to pay the rent. However, these horror films each had something special and of surprisingly quality to offer. Most interesting of the bunch is the never-released Grizzly II, on which Cargill and I go into startling detail. We also announce our July 4th appearance at CONvergence in Minneapolis! Can’t venture to America’s Hoth that weekend? No problem! We’ll be recording an episode during the CON and will make it available to you, our beloved Junkies, directly thereafter. You should follow Brian (@Briguysalisbury), Cargill (@Massawyrm), and the show (@Junkfoodcinema). Download Episode #14 Directly

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Krull Movie

For this week’s episode, Cargill and I explore the wonderful world of 1983′s Krull. We examine the movie’s glorious genre pastiche and undeniably rich character development, as well as spinning our own perspective on “the glaive problem.” We also explain how the structure and spirit of Krull makes it the perfect cinematic appetizer to James Gunn’s Guardians of the Galaxy. Oh, and I may or may not analyze the startling accuracy of the Krull Atari game…spoiler alert, I totally do that. You should follow Brian (@Briguysalisbury), Cargill (@Massawyrm), and the show (@Junkfoodcinema). Download Episode #13 Directly

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Flash Gordon

On this week’s episode, in honor of the upcoming X-Men flick, Cargill and I mount our own exploration into alternate timelines as part of a new recurring series we’ve dubbed Movies of Future Past. For the inaugural foray, we imagine a universe in which George Lucas had actually acquired the rights to Flash Gordon and made that his 1977 sci-fi opus instead of Star Wars. It’s one of cinema’s most intriguing What If’s. Heck, as it stands, Lucas’ fascination with the Flash Gordon serials of the ’30s actually ended up informing so much of what Star Wars became. But that’s in this dimension, where history books have facts and whatnot. It’s far more entertaining to travel to other timelines where we’re confined only to the limits of our wild speculations!!! You should follow Brian (@Briguysalisbury), Cargill (@Massawyrm), and the show (@Junkfoodcinema). Download Episode #12 Directly

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Labyrinth Movie

Come along and ride on a different kind of fantastic voyage. This week, in honor of the release of Cargill’s second novel, “Queen of the Dark Things,” we discuss our favorite cinematic examples of urban fantasy. Whether in the form of dueling immortals, vengeance-seeking grunge rockers, or the full arsenal of Jim Henson‘s creative genius, these clashes of fantasy and reality capture our imagination in so many ways and served as the inspiration for Cargill’s new book. We also spend FAR too much time talking about Gone Fishin’. You’re welcome, world. You should follow Brian (@Briguysalisbury), Cargill (@Massawyrm), and the show (@Junkfoodcinema). Download Episode #11 Directly

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Bob Hoskins in The Long Good Friday

Last week, the film world lost a giant. Often called The Cockney Cagney, Bob Hoskins was an actor who didn’t just demand your attention on screen, he grabbed you by the throat, turned you upside down, and shook you until you could only applaud. Cargill and I do our best to adequately honor this towering talent via some of our favorites of his performances. Sure, Who Framed Roger Rabbit and Hook are tremendous films, but we stick to the deep track stuff. We also explain why Hoskins would have made the perfect Wolverine. And yes, there will be discussion of Super Mario Brothers that borders on tribute. You’ve been warned. You should follow Brian (@Briguysalisbury), Cargill (@Massawyrm), and the show (@Junkfoodcinema). Download Episode #10 Directly

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Man on Fire Movie

It was inevitable. We had been getting along too well. But here finally in our ninth episode of Junkfood Cinema, a line in the sand has been drawn. Cargill and I engage in a comparative examination of both versions of Man on Fire. That’s right, Tony Scott‘s gritty revenge vehicle for Denzel Washington was in fact a remake. But whereas I fancy the original with Scott Glenn in the Creasy role, Cargill is more partial to the remake. Truth be told, this wasn’t much of a shootout. We both have elements of each iteration of Man on Fire that we adore, but that doesn’t stop us from taking these two versions apart piece by piece. PIECE BY PIECE! Deciding which version you prefer is between you and these films, but it’s our job to arrange the meeting, and we’re all out of bubble gum. You should follow Brian (@Briguysalisbury), Cargill (@Massawyrm), and the show (@Junkfoodcinema). Download Episode #9 Directly

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Rolling Thunder

This week, Cargill and I call down the thunder. Specifically, we discuss one of our absolute favorite exploitation revenge films from the 1970s: Rolling Thunder. Written by Paul Schrader (Taxi Driver, Raging Bull) pens this incredibly subversive Vietnam War parable about a man pushed back into a life of violence when his triumphant return form a POW camp is interrupted by a thieving group of good ol’ boys/murders. Cargill and I chat about the baser satisfactions of this revenge movie, as well as the legitimately brilliant performances from William Devane and Tommy Lee Jones, and the intriguing religious allegory of the film’s intensely layered script. That, plus…you know, Sam Peckinpah-worthy shoot-outs. You should follow Brian (@Briguysalisbury), Cargill (@Massawyrm), and the show (@Junkfoodcinema). Download Episode #8 Directly

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Fright Night 1985

Vampires are timeless; by their very nature immortal. Still, Hollywood has so shat the coffin with vampire movies of late that the creeping shadow on the wall no longer belongs to Nosferatu, but rather to permeating audience apathy. But there was a time, gentle viewer, when the legacy of the vampire canon found a way to integrate gloriously into the zeitgeist of a new era. That time was the 1980s. On this week’s episode, Cargill and I discuss some of our favorite vampire movies of the ’80s and examine how they incorporated the spirit of that decade into the long-running mythology of the blood-sucking undead. We won’t say this is an episode of Junkfood Cinema that you should sink your teeth into, because that’s far too obvious. That being said, you should totally sink your teeth into this episode of Junkfood Cinema. You should follow Brian (@Briguysalisbury), Cargill (@Massawyrm), and the show (@Junkfoodcinema). Download Episode #7 Directly

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Razorback Movie

Last week, the cult film world lost a true luminary. While you might not be terribly familiar with the name Everett De Roche, this staggeringly talented screenwriter is responsible for many of the absolute best Ozploitation films. On today’s episode, Cargill and I sit down to discuss our favorite flicks written by this Aussie auteur. From Roadgames to Razorback, from Harlequin to Long Weekend, De Roche’s contributions to one of the greatest niche movements in cinema are recounted with much enthusiasm. Join us as we go talkabout. You should follow Brian (@Briguysalisbury), Cargill (@Massawyrm), and the show (@Junkfoodcinema). Download Episode #6 Directly

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Face Off Movie

In this, well, rather unusual episode of Junkfood Cinema, Cargill and I delve into the backwards, topsy-turvy world of body swap movies. Whether via a fortune cookie, a birthday wish, or the totally possible act of physically trading faces, these films offer a variety of avenues for transcending one’s given physical form and developing total empathy. Also, you know, Face/Off. Also, not to give too much away, but one of us admits to formerly wearing an earring. You should follow Brian (@Briguysalisbury), Cargill (@Massawyrm), and the show (@Junkfoodcinema). Download Episode #5 Directly

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Michael Beck in The Warriors

In this installment of Junkfood Cinema, Cargill and I discuss one of our favorite under-appreciated actors: Michael Beck. For a very brief period of time, Beck was a rising star in Hollywood. His breakout performance in The Warriors placed him firmly on the map, only to see his career stall a mere three years later thanks to the notorious bomb that was Xanadu. Still, during his all-too-short heyday, Beck appeared in some fantastic cult fare including Hal Needham’s Megaforce and the often heralded (at least on this show) Battletruck. We hope you enjoy this retrosBECKtive. You should follow Brian (@Briguysalisbury), Cargill (@Massawyrm), and the show (@Junkfoodcinema). Download Episode #4 Directly

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Dick Miller in Gremlins

For this loving spoonful of Junkfood Cinema, Cargill and I find ourselves in the presence of true greatness. During SXSW, we were able to sit down with actor/writer/genre mainstay Dick Miller. Not familiar with Dick Miller? Actually, we’re willing to bet Mogwais to Terminators that you ARE familiar with Dick Miller, though likely by face moreso than name. He has been appearing in films for nearly six decades, and has the type of career that actually charts a direct line through the history of film itself. Whether working with Corman on movies like A Bucket of Blood, Rock All Night, and Piranha, his various team-ups with Joe Dante, or any of the other innumerable cult classics that comprise his resume, Dick Miller is the very essence of a living legend. His importance to genre and cult cinema are not merely the opinion of these Junkfood Cinema hosts. That Guy Dick Miller, a documentary about the life and career of our special guest, just played SXSW. The doc finds some of the biggest names in the industry reminiscing about the silver-screen splendor of Mr. Miller. You should follow Brian (@Briguysalisbury), Cargill (@Massawyrm), and the show (@Junkfoodcinema). Download Episode #3 Directly

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junkfoodbanner

For this second helping of Junkfood Cinema, Brian and Cargill first chew on a very important issue: ironic film appreciation. Too often films like those that will appear on the menu of this podcast are viewed through the lens of arrogant snark. A dividing line needs to be drawn. In the second segment, your resident junk men serve up one of their favorite movies from one of their favorite forgotten genres: 80s Italian post-apocalyptic ripoffs. If you aren’t familiar with this strange, often entirely plagiaristic movement, then 1990: The Bronx Warriors is the flick on which to cut your teeth. A phenomenal frappe of Walter Hill’s The Warriors and John Carpenter’s Escape from New York, Bronx Warriors is a triumph of the weird, and an endlessly fun film. You should follow Brian (@Briguysalisbury), Cargill (@Massawyrm), and the show (@Junkfoodcinema). Download Episode #2 Directly

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junkfoodbanner

Unwrap the first bite of FSR’s newest, and possibly most ill-advised podcast: Junkfood Cinema. You’ve heard plenty of cyber banter on the “true classics,” on what’s popular in film now, and about projections for movies yet-to-come. Junkfood Cinema is a shame-free celebration of those films that have managed to slip through the cracks of time; the lost children of the medium. These are films relegated to mainstream obscurity, and most even erroneously dubbed as “terrible.” To ravenous genre consumers like me and screenwriter/novelist C. Robert Cargill, there is nothing more satisfying then gorging on cult and exploitation gems with the mad gluttony of a pre-dawn fourth meal. For the first auditory iteration of FSR’s long-running b-movie column, we  issue the show’s cheese-soaked, deep-fried mission statement and then wax affectionate over one of their absolute favorite movies: Roger Corman’s Battle Beyond the Stars. We hope you enjoy the new Junkfood Cinema podcast. It’s so good, it just has to be bad for you. You should follow Brian (@Briguysalisbury), Cargill (@Massawyrm), and the show (@Junkfoodcinema). Download Episode #1 Directly

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Stay Tuned

It’s not often that movies find themselves double-covered for Junkfood Cinema, but that’s largely because we reserve double-coverage for our fudge-dipped Oreos…that we then dip in fudge…and then in rainbow cake frosting. Triple-double-covered Oreos notwithstanding, there are certain titles, such as 1992′s Stay Tuned, whose importance to the medium of film cannot be adequately communicated with just one paltry article. Or just one poultry article for that matter, so prepare your palates for a second helping of those delicious Chicken Corn (f)Ritters. Peter Hyams’ hellevision meta comedy may seem at arms length with contemporary audiences, but in fact it has a great deal in common with a recent meta horror film. You know, like even more than the word meta. It took a recent screening of a 35mm print to finally cement it, but Stay Tuned and The Cabin in the Woods boast some bizarre similarities. That’s not to say Cabin writers Joss Whedon and Drew Goddard borrowed from Stay Tuned, nor am I even suggesting that they’ve seen Stay Tuned, but at the very least the two movies are kindred enough as to belong on the same channel.

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jfc fast furious

Welcome back to Junkfood Cinema; we live our lives a quarter-pounder at a time. Speaking of, did you know that the word “franchise” isn’t always preceded by the words “fast food?” I know, we were just as shocked as you are. It appears it can also be used to refer to the collective sequels of a movie. Sometimes these sequels are fantastic, such as Friday the 13th VI, and sometimes they are just plain awful, such as…admittedly large chunks of Friday the 13th VI. However, the best franchises are those that are able to pull us into their individual universes to the point that we eagerly await each new entry regardless of he absurdity of its ever-rising titular numeral. Take for example, the Fast & Furious films; those drag-racing men in their driving machines (or how we flew from reason to crashing through cargo planes in six movies). It started out as an innocent remake of Point Break, with souped-up hot rods substituted for surfboards and Paul Walker‘s nonexistent charisma substituted for Keanu Reeves’ nonexistent charisma. However, the films have fastly and furiously become experiments in mayhem and extreme sports, if extreme stupidity is an extreme sport. For this reason, and the tractor-beam-like attraction of Vin Diesel‘s uni-muscle body composition, our initial apathy toward this franchise has morphed slowly into unhealthy petulant sense of ownership of that universe. At this point, The Fast & the Furious is our beloved annual-to-semi-annual visitor; a friendly second-cousin who happens to be equipped with […]

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