C.O.G.

C.O.G.

You’d think that by now, someone would have made a movie out of David Sedaris‘ work. It almost happened back in 2001- four stories from Sedaris’ “Me Talk Pretty One Day” were optioned into a feature film, with Wayne Wang set to direct, but after Sedaris pulled out, fearing his family would be portrayed poorly onscreen, the project quickly fell apart. It seems the famed humorist has finally had a change of heart. Kyle Patrick Alvarez‘s C.O.G. (which stands for Child of God), an adaptation of one of the stories from Sedaris’ “Naked,” marks the first time his work will be seen on the big screen. This trailer’s got charm to spare, but C.O.G. seems like it’ll hinge on its lead actor’s performance more than anything else. From this two minutes of footage, Jonathan Groff (who’ll be playing the Sedaris-based lead) looks as though he’s got that standoffish snark down pat, but the actor’s biggest claim to fame is his part on Glee, a television show not known for its subtlety. Hopefully, more intelligent source material will overcome any urges he has to break out into song.

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frameline 2013

You might think, with all the acclaim pouring in for Michael Douglas and Matt Damon’s performances in Behind the Candelabra, that the film industry’s “gay moment” has arrived. The proliferation of LGBT-themed movies achieving wide release now might seem to signal that the credits are rolling on what film historian Vito Russo called the celluloid closet and that the gay genre can now dissolve itself to join the rest of the movies as simply that — movies. But the state of things isn’t actually that far along. Neither Douglas nor Damon are themselves gay, nor are there comparable gay stars who could have led that movie. And even though Behind the Candelabra was directed by Steven Soderbergh and featured blockbuster movie stars, no distributor would buy the film. It had to air on HBO. In reality, though there has been immense progress in the past few years, the LGBT community still has far to come in Hollywood. That’s why the Frameline International LGBT Film Festival is so significant. The oldest and largest film festival in the world devoted to lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender programming, Frameline is a showcase for the best work that you still won’t see in the cinemaplex, an opportunity to reflect on the history of our community and its contribution to the movies, and just a gay old time. In its 37th year, the festival runs from June 20th to 30th, ending with Pride, and screens a panoply of fascinating films at the Castro, Roxie, Victoria […]

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Hand stamps

I should have known it was coming on Sunday, when a perfectly attractive young lady who was sitting next to me on a Sundance Film Festival shuttle loudly huffed to a pal sitting behind us, “I haven’t even kissed anyone in a year! I just need to make out with someone tonight. Anyone!” Her sentiments were matched by just about everyone else on Day 5 of the Sundance Film Festival, as I witnessed high school dance-style bump and grind dancing at a swank party at the Grey Goose Lounge, a drunk man on Main St. screaming at a cab driver that he knew that the cab driver won’t pick him because he wanted to have sex with him (surely, sir, it could have nothing to do with the fact that you’re drunk and screaming in the middle of Main St. at two in the morning), and another taxi passenger asking random strangers if they had hookers or blow. Everyone at Sundance has gone mad and sex-obsessed and insane. Me? I was just tired.

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C.O.G.

Film festival scheduling is a delicate art, a precarious balance of needs and desires, a rigorous exercise in making puzzle pieces fit. It’s hard, is what I’m saying, and it’s harder still when a fest’s programming is rounded out with so many films that sound so good – like this year’s Sundance Film Festival slate. As the fest rolled out their picks late last year, I’d spend whole mornings squealing over their listings, getting jazzed weeks in advance for films I hoped I’d be able to see. After all that, I’ve narrowed down my picks to ten films I cannot wait to see, a list that includes some Sundance favorites, some returning stars, Canada’s best film of the year, a possible break-out hit or two, and even a doc about mountain climbing, because those are just the sorts of films I wait all year to see at Sundance. Take a look at the ten films I’m most likely to shiv someone in order to see, after the break.

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