Bryan Cranston

Saul and Walt in Breaking Bad

Saul Goodman’s solo spinoff series just added a new and increasingly complicated wrinkle. According to executive producer Peter Gould, via the Daily News, Better Call Saul will feature a “floating timeline.” As in, the series will take place before Breaking Bad. And during Breaking Bad. And after Breaking Bad. Whenever Gould wants it to be in any given episode. Considering the show was originally supposed to be set in the early ’80s, that means we’re getting at least four decades’ worth of Goodman’s rise to sleazy, inflatable power. Upon reading this, the brain’s first response should be “Cool, I guess.” This gives Better Call Saul an easy way to reunite the old Breaking Bad gang in scenes where they’re clearly older than the characters they’re supposed to be portraying (although the occasional Breaking Bad flashback already gave us that gift). More Bryan Cranston, more Dean Norris (maybe?), more Aaron Paul (nope, not so long as Aaron Paul is to be believed). And we’ll finally see Saul manage that Cinnabon in Omaha, which is worth the cost of the whole damn show.

read more...

Evgenia Eliseeva

Of all the men, in all the years, it be hard to argue that Bryan Cranston is not, in fact, having the best of them all. After an Emmy Award-winning run of the spectacular Breaking Bad finally and majestically came to a close, the actor got in some blockbuster experience with Godzilla, where he played the coveted role of being the crackpot who actually knew from the beginning what was actually going on beneath the Earth’s surface. Not content to just coast on his laurels, he’s been filling his downtime in New York City, portraying President Lyndon B. Johnson in the play All the Way for which last night he took home the Tony Award for Best Leading Actor in a Play. But lest you think he’s decided to leave movies behind, it looks like a collision of those two worlds is in order. Steven Spielberg is eyeing All the Way — which also took home a Tony last night for Best Play — to be transformed into a miniseries. The Robert Schenkkan play follows President Johnson beginning with President John F. Kennedy’s assassination and his subsequent inauguration, throughout his first year in office. It’s a packed first year too; Johnson uses his new power to pass the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and goes on to win enough favor that he stays in office for a full term. And if the Tony’s are any indication, Cranston plays the former president to cranky old man perfection.

read more...

Bryan Cranston in Godzilla

It’s obvious why director Gareth Edwards was chosen to helm another American reboot of Godzilla. His feature debut Monsters showed he could achieve spectacle on the cheap, build a convincing world inhabited by monsters, and, best of all, fill that world with compelling characters. It was a human story that happened to have monsters looming in the background. With Godzilla, it’s a shame it’s not the other away around, because the stunning CG creatures are far more entertaining than the humans they play second fiddle to. That’s unfortunate for many reasons, including the film’s very promising prologue. Bryan Cranston and Juliette Binoche play Joe and Sandra Brody (in what’s likely a nice nod to Jaws), a married team who work together in a Japanese power plant. Sandra is checking on an electrical problem when a massive accident happens, causing the destruction of the power plant, the evacuation of the city, and her death. Fifteen years later, their son Ford (Aaron Taylor-Johnson) is living in San Francisco with his wife Elle (Elizabeth Olsen). He’s in the military, so he’s been away from home for a little while, but he returns only to learn that his father has been arrested in Japan, which means reluctantly flying across the world to help. When Ford gets there, Joe strikes him as the same paranoid lunatic he remembers from growing up, but this time his father has proof there was a cover-up of the real cause of the disaster that killed Ford’s mother. That cause? Monsters. Not Godzilla, though, who the film wisely plays as the misunderstood hero he is.

read more...

Godzilla Hand

If you’ve appreciated the tact taken with the Godzilla marketing so far, how we haven’t really seen much of the monster, you might not want to watch the new international trailer. If you want to know as little as possible before the remake arrives in theaters, just close this post and go read about our favorite movies of the Tribeca Film Festival (or jump over to Nonfics for the documentary version of that list) or anything else. But if you’ve been dying to see some prehistoric giant monster action, then today is your lucky day. If you aren’t afraid to know what this new Godzilla is all about, keep on reading this post until you get to that embedded motion picture box and click on the play icon. I’ll join you again on the other side. 

read more...

Godzilla

How do Americans always lose track of Godzilla? Back in ’98, the big guy could slip behind a couple skyscrapers and the entire military would just stand around scratching their heads, despite the existence of planes and satellites and so, so much equipment that is perfectly useful for keeping tabs of a giant green dinosaur. Well, he’s slipped out of our fingers again. Judging from Bryan Cranston‘s powerful, shouty voiceover at the start of this new Godzilla trailer, it sounds like the government had themselves a slight Godzilla problem back in 1954, but they were able to sweep all that nonsense under the rug. From the looks of it, it somehow involved reducing him to a skeleton, which make the modern day monster Godzilla #2. And the American people never had a clue. Unlikely as it may be, it’s a neat conceit for a Godzilla movie and a clever little way of paying homage to Ishiro Honda‘s original film. It’s also an excuse to see a skyscraper-sized lizard stomp across human civilization, which is really all anyone cares about.

read more...

Bryan Cranston Writer

Why Watch? This short would probably be worth it merely to hear Bryan Cranston‘s noir-perfect voice deliver lines like a construction worker shoved into a tutu, but the work from director Brandon Polanco has a moodiness to it that pushes beyond the star power. In Writer’s Block, Cranston plays a screenwriter suffering from the titular malady who invents a mystery woman to help him through the pain. Then, he sees her in real life. Suggestive and angsty, it’s shot in black and white with a crisp angle toward accentuating the writer’s aggravation (and loneliness). There’s a clear hint of Lynch to all of it, and it unsurprisingly leaves a palpable sense of unease on the tip of your tongue. An intriguing flick, it also has an interesting backstory to its production (which you can read more about here) as a contest Cranston held for production assistants working on Cold Comes the Night. Getting Walter White to star in your script is a hell of a prize.

read more...

review cold comes the night

Chloe (Alice Eve) is single mom who works the desk of a small town motel when she’s not cleaning the rooms or taking care of her daughter. It’s a drudgery only made worse by a visit from a Child Protective Services agent who tells Chloe the motel is not a suitable living arrangement for her little girl. She’s given two weeks to fix the impossible situation, but before she can even dwell on her misery two men come looking to stay the night. One won’t survive to morning, but the other, a partially blind immigrant named Topol (Bryan Cranston), discovers that the Jeep he arrived in has been taken into police custody along with the other man’s body. He forcibly enlists Chloe’s help in retrieving a certain something hidden inside the vehicle, but Billy (Logan Marshall-Green), a local and very dirty cop, complicates things by being a greedy bastard. Cold Comes the Night is a simple little thriller that delivers the goods with a very economical style. It succeeds in part because it doesn’t extend its reach beyond the basics, but just as important are the trio of solid performances and some relatively sharp directing and writing by Tze Chun.

read more...

Breaking Bad

That sound you heard coming from your computer, your phone, your tablet, your whosiwhatsit, and your web-enabled whatever over this weekend was the collective noise kicked up by the Internet as it broke, and broke in the best way possible – from joy! While television’s beloved Breaking Bad ended earlier this year, AMC’s game-changing series still has plenty of treats to offer its loyal fans, even if one of them leaked a touch too early on the interwebs. Fans of the Bryan Cranston-starring show have long toyed with a good-natured “theory” that the end of Breaking Bad would lead into the beginning of Cranston’s other well-known series, Malcolm in the Middle, with his Walter White going underground before turning into Malcolm’s dearly dysfunctional dad Hal. It was certainly a fun idea, if not a totally improbable one, but it seems as if the team behind Breaking Bad took it to heart, filming a jokey alternate ending to the series that sees Cranston reprising his Hal role, alongside Malcolm wife Jane Kaczmarek, and firmly nodding to the fan theory. It’s very funny and very clever – and it’s also very satisfying, and not just because it’s amusing.

read more...

Breaking Bad Finale

The fifth season of Breaking Bad was all about anti-climax. That sounds bad, since we tend to think of climaxes as the best part of, ahem, several different things, and whatever comes after as an inevitable letdown. But after Season Four — wherein Walt engineered Gus Fring’s demise — the series lost its epic ambitions. Again, that’s not a bad thing. The fifth season demonstrated the impossibility of Walt’s transition back to civilian life. Once he’d gotten blood on his hands, he couldn’t wash it off. The question of how to live with stubbornly dirty hands drove this last season. It was an anti-climax that showed how difficult, complicated, and satisfying anti-climaxes can be. (This season’s climax, of course, was “Ozymandias.”) “Felina,” written and directed by Vince Gilligan, was the anticlimactic finale to an anticlimactic final season. It was also an extremely fitting one for the series. It showed Walter White, who made a (rather infamous) name for himself by producing the Southwest’s best crank and outsmarted his many, many enemies through his extreme methodicalness, closing up all the loose ends in his life. “Felina” was about Walter settling accounts: with Skyler, his children, Hank and Marie (in a way), Elliot and Gretchen, the Nazis, and, of course, Jesse. The machine gun he had in his trunk added just enough ambiguous tension throughout the episode to keep it from being a straightforward “Walter White visits his past” storyline. It also allowed to Gilligan showcase the chief strengths of the episode: its micro-detail-oriented plotting (the ricin!), its stomach-churning suspense (Walter framed like […]

read more...

Breaking Bad Granite State

There was no way writer/director Peter Gould’s “Granite State” could top last week’s whirlwind. The writers may have known that, which is why yesterday’s installment was low-key by design — it’s the calm before the storm. Instead of the slowly churning and building dread the show offers at its best, the events of the episode were sped through — too quickly — to set up the circumstances for next week’s series finale (sob). (Kudos, by the way, to the Breaking Bad cast and crew for its Best Drama and Best Supporting Actress (Anna Gunn) Emmy wins. They’re long overdue — and still not enough.) Freedom dueled with greed in “Granite State,” and the latter won every freaking time. Todd, Lydia, and Walt were all given choices this episode, and their more craven selves prevailed at every turn.

read more...

Trumbo Cranston

In 1953, Dalton Trumbo won his first Oscar for writing Roman Holiday, but the man who went up to the podium (and whose name was on the film) was Trumbo’s friend Ian McLellan Hunter. Three years later, Trumbo won a second Oscar for The Brave One, but the name engraved on the statuette was “Robert Rich.” Why did he need a human stand-in and a pen name if he was doing such stellar work? Because he had been blacklisted after serving nearly a year in prison for contempt of Congress. You see, there was a hilarious time in American history that we all look back on and laugh at because it was dominated by members of the government being terrified of ideas that were different from their own. Although it’s difficult to imagine a United States Senator (and a Republican at that!) railing against a leftist agenda in Hollywood today, it’s of paramount importance that we remember Trumbo and his experience as persona non grata. It was his Communist Party affiliation that Joe McCarthy and pals feared, but it was the studio heads who were cowardly enough to bar Trumbo and others from working. There’s already a documentary about him called Trumbo, and according to Deadline Hollywood, that will also be the name of a new movie from Jay Roach — following up on his political interests explored in The Campaign — and screenwriter John McNamara. Bryan Cranston will play Trumbo as the mustachioed artist battles against the blacklist while […]

read more...

Breaking Bad Ozymandias

“Ozymandias” has got to be some kind of epic meta-dare. Vince Gilligan evokes Percy Shelly’s famous poem, in which the titular “king of kings” commands future generations, “Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair!” In Shelly’s telling, though, Ozymandias was an accomplished fool. By his haughty, fearsome decree, “Nothing beside remains. Round the decay/Of that colossal wreck, boundless and bare/The lone and level sands stretch far away.” In creating and crafting such an astounding episode of television (not to mention series), though, Gilligan has thrown down the gauntlet to TV critics, historians, audiences, and his peers: Breaking Bad is TV’s version of the Sistine Chapel. “Ozymandias” will likely be the scene in which God reaches out to Adam. Forget this at your own peril.   (Between “Ozymandias” and Walt Whitman’s “Leaves of Grass,” Gilligan sure is rewarding all his viewers with English degrees.)

read more...

Breaking Bad Tohajiilee

So Hank’s definitely dead, right? Because it’s rare that a dogged pursuer of justice in a morally anarchistic universe calls his wife and tells her he’s solved the biggest case of his career, using boastful but foreboding language like, “Hey baby, I got him. Dead to rights” and “It may be awhile before I get home” and still gets to live. Don’t forget: Hank was this close to early retirement, too, since the shame of Heisenberg being his brother-in-law would’ve ended his DEA career. Though every meth cook and drug mogul fears the police, rare is the one who meets his end in a prison cell. Breaking Bad is not a show where law and order prevails. But Hank’s brains don’t yet look like the ones in his kitchen trash can, so let’s not mourn him. “To’hajiilee” wasn’t really about him anyway, but about the exquisite chess game Walt and Jesse played against each other. Their square-off begins as soon as the title sequence wisps off the screen, with Hank convincing Gomie to trust Timmy Dipshit’s plan. Thus begins another episode where Jesse is underestimated — which made Walt calling Jesse “stupid” while falling right into his plan wildly satisfying and may be the one thing that helps the unarmed Jesse survive the battle of the bullets.

read more...

Breaking Bad Rabid Dog

“Rabid Dog” is a transitional episode, and not a particularly elegant one at that. Like Walt’s old Pontiac Aztek, it’s simply a vehicle that’ll transport us to where we need to go, style and good taste be damned. Thus we have Walt and Jesse plotting each other’s demise (Walt’s being more violent, of course), Skyler urging Walt to take “full measures” (in another sacrifice of character over story), and Jesse and Hank’s inevitable team-up to bring down Walt. The theme of transitions was telegraphed by the episode’s two hallway scenes. The first occurs at the beginning of the episode, when Walt, with his pocket pistol in hand, crouches along the main corridor of his gasoline-soaked house. The buzzy, clangy, twitchy soundtrack makes clear its homage to another empty, dread-filled, imminently bloody hallway — that of The Shining trailer. The second takes place at Hank and Marie’s house, when Jesse, after passing out cold, wakes up to find Marie down the hall. Worlds collide. She asks him if he wants any coffee. A new world is born from the wreckage of the old.

read more...

Ferris Bueller

It’s the time of year when children head back to campus, but even if you’ve already graduated, it’s still easy to get into the trapper keeper mindset with movies. Beloved culture commentator Matt Patches joins us to celebrate and dissect the greatest movies about school (and escaping it) as we attempt to pinpoint the film that best encapsulates all the feelings we had waiting to be saved by the bell. Plus, Lords of Salem director Rob Zombie joins us to explain making bad career choices as a viable career choice (including his forthcoming hockey movie), we deliver the news in only 3 words, and then we leave the kind words at home for the giant kind of shouting debate that Ben Affleck’s Batman casting deserves. You should follow Rob Zombie (@robzombie), Matt Patches (@misterpatches), the show (@brokenprojector), Geoff (@drgmlatulippe) and Scott (@scottmbeggs) on Twitter for more fun stuff on a daily basis. And, as always, if you like the show (or hate it with seething fervor), please help us out with a review. Download Episode #31 Directly Or subscribe Through iTunes

read more...

Bryan Cranston

As a devourer of movie culture, you probably caught the Cosmic Book News “story” that Bryan Cranston had been cast as Lex Luthor in Man of Steel 2: Ben Affleck Boogaloo, and you most definitely recognized that it didn’t pass the smell test. Six appearance deal for the baddie? Matt Damon as Aquaman? Thirteen appearances as Batman for Affleck? Right. It’s weird to think the scoop came from a site notorious for making things up. But now that Rolling Stone has lazily broadcast the bullshit, simultaneously giving it credibility without lifting a finger to do any research, it becomes slightly more important to spread the word that Cranston hasn’t been cast in the role. Tell your excited Breaking Bad fans the news and be there to hold them or remind them to still hold out hope. And if Cranston eventually does get cast, can I lobby for a non-bald Luthor? There’s nothing like watching a Superman movie and wondering why he’s battling Walter White.

read more...

Breaking Bad Confessions

For most of “Confessions,” Walt is the eye of Hurricane Heisenberg. While everyone else around him reels and whirls and wobbles, Walt observes quietly and manipulates gently. He plots while others plotz. Now a master of concealment and Plan Bs — so close to finally becoming Gus Fring — he dons his best father-knows-best voice and cardigan to reassure Junior, threaten Hank, and pacify Jesse. At least temporarily. Only Junior is clueless enough to still fall for Walt’s act, now almost campy in its wholesomeness. After Walt serenely suggests to his teenaged son that he’s on death’s door again, he and Skyler meet with Hank and Marie to instruct the in-laws that they’re not to use his children as pawns — a demand he makes while using his son as emotional ammunition: “This investigation, Hank. Do you realize what this will do to him?” When Hank challenges him to “step up, be a man, and admit what you’ve done,” Walt placidly responds, “There’s nothing to confess” before handing him his “confession” tape.

read more...

breaking-bad-season-6-episode-2

Families that stick together are the best at beating the courts. That’s such a truism of mobster movies and TV shows that even Arrested Development drove storylines with it. Of course, the personal, legal, and moral antagonism between Walt and Hank immediately dispels any hope for a “we are family” scenario between the Whites and the Schraders. “Buried,” then, finds Walt and Skyler reuniting in desperation, and Skyler and Marie shirking their loyalties to each other — and rooting for their respective brother-in-laws’ failure. The episode begins with a teaser that could have come out of any episode of The X-Files. An ordinary man finds something extraordinary: bricks of cash strewn all over his street. He follows the money trail and makes an even stranger discovery: a dead-eyed young man, Jesse, spinning on a merry-go-round, thoroughly innocent and guilty at the same time. (Of course, if this were an episode of The X-Files, Jesse would start shooting lightning bolts out of his eyes or something.)

read more...

Heisenberg

By now, you’ve seen the season premiere for the second half of the fifth season of Breaking Bad (and if you haven’t, good luck parsing what I just wrote and also, why haven’t you?) and gasped along with the rest of the Twittersphere at large (has there ever been a show so adored by the social media masses as Breaking Bad?). Having gone nearly a year without Walt, Jesse, and the rest of the blue-hued crew (by “crew” we mean meth, baby, and lots of it), anticipation for the final episodes in Vince Gilligan’s opus reached a fever pitch, well, probably long before the latest episode actually aired. And was it worth it? Man, was it worth it. With only eight episodes in the show’s final half-season, acceleration is the name of the game. After all, both of the fifth season’s premieres have opened with a flash forward that give us small but incredibly effective and intriguing glimpses into Walt’s world after some sort of earth-shattering event. A spiritual twin to the first episode of the season (that would be wonderful “Live Free or Die”), last night’s premiere (“Blood Money,” because that’s what it all is at this point) echoed and followed the events that began the season at large. Walter, seemingly post-birthday breakfast, returns to his abandoned and dilapidated home (which is also a new haven for pool-skating ruffians, damn kids) to retrieve his last pack of that deadly ricin. All of that is jaw-dropping enough – the broken-down […]

read more...

Blood Money

Walter White is a cockroach. Breaking Bad‘s second-half fifth season premiere, “Blood Money,” is a perfect summary of the retired drug kingpin’s unbeatable survival skills: sociopathy, cunning, emotional manipulation, meticulousness, and violence – or at least the threat thereof. Even with the return of his cancer, the apparent front-page news of his crimes, and the likely target on his back (it’s probable that one of the ten thugs he had stabbed in prison have vengeful family members), Walt is seen alive and free in the future, covering his tracks by recovering a vial of ricin, while his house, the symbol of everything he had worked and sweated and killed for, sits rotting and condemned, picked at by teenage vultures. This was a flash-forward much more compelling than that of the fifth season premiere’s birthday breakfast, mostly because it suggests Walter’s imminent notoriety. The legend of Heisenberg will extend beyond the narco-corridos, which means the truth will come out: Walt will leave behind a trail of poisoned lives, including those of his somewhat guilty wife, his college-bound son and baby daughter, his inept-looking DEA brother-in-law, and his former accomplice. It’s a vision similar to the chilling end of The Shield, where survival becomes its own form of prison.

read more...
NEXT PAGE  
Some movie websites serve the consumer. Some serve the industry. At Film School Rejects, we serve at the pleasure of the connoisseur. We provide the best reviews, interviews and features to millions of dedicated movie fans who know what they love and love what they know. Because we, like you, simply love the art of the moving picture.
Fantastic Fest 2014
6 Filmmaking Tips: James Gunn
Got a Tip? Send it here:
editors@filmschoolrejects.com
Publisher:
Neil Miller
Managing Editor:
Scott Beggs
Associate Editors:
Rob Hunter
Kate Erbland
Christopher Campbell
All Rights Reserved © 2006-2014 Reject Media, LLC | Privacy Policy | Design & Development by Face3