Brandon Routh

Why Watch? This is unbridled awesome. BenDavid Grabinksi‘s sharp short film features Brandon Routh (semi-extending his Scott Pilgrim swagger) and Bret Harrison as two security guards who work for a mysterious corporation that has…more dangerous emergencies than the average OmniCorp MegaGlobal. It’s the kind of movie that demands a standing ovation and should satisfy fans of genre work and dry humor alike.Watch Cost of Living right now, and then watch it ten more times. Then try to help me figure out how to apply for a job at FO Industries. What will it cost? Only 8 minutes. Skip Work. You’ve Got Time For More Short Films.

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Drinking Games

Boy, that Brandon Routh is a real lady-killer. And in the movie Dylan Dog: Dead of Night, he’s a real lady-killer if she’s a monster and she wronged him in the past. We may not have seen much of Mr. Routh aside from his small parts in Zack and Miri Make a Porno and Scott Pilgrim vs. The World, but that doesn’t mean he ain’t working. Dylan Dog follows Routh as a private investigator in New Orleans who is brought back into the monster hunting game. But we don’t care about monsters. We care about New Orleans. For this feature, every day is Mardi Gras, and everywhere open containers are legal.

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The creators of Dylan Dog: Dead of Night, the long-delayed big screen version of the popular Italian comic, have attempted to translate its pulpy noir feel to the big screen. So they’ve got that going for them. And that’s about it. Kevin Munroe’s flick is otherwise a chore to sit through, a choppily edited festival of hastily conjoined pop cultural archetypes. With terrible acting, a narrative on autopilot and chaotic blurs passing for action scenes, it’s a direct-to-DVD caliber sojourn through the dregs of comic book adaptation. Brandon Routh, the fallen Superman, plays New Orleans-based ex-supernatural investigator Dylan Dog, who’s drawn back in the game when a werewolf kills the father of beautiful client Elizabeth Ryan (Anita Briem). With his wisecracking zombie sidekick (Sam Huntington), Dog traverses the Crescent City’s criminal underworld in an attempt to unwrap the conspiracy behind the murder.

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On June 7, 2011, everything that you love about Superman, be it the Richard Donner films of the late 70s and 80s or Bryan Singer’s Superman Returns, will come full circle. No, you’re not being flown to the set of Zack Snyder’s Superman: Man of Steel. You will instead have the chance to own an eight-disc collection of Superman movies that will be in crisp, beautiful high definition and include over 20 hours of special features. I don’t know about you, but that’s a gift that keeps on giving. No matter what you’re after, original theatrical or expanded editions, this one appears to have it all. If you’re curious to see just how much extra Superman goodness there is, just click on through the jump and see the set’s detailed layout. And then you’ll know why I’m personally very excited.

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Brandon Routh as Superman

Nobody will ever truly replace Christopher Reeve as the image of Superman, but Brandon Routh has earned DC Comics’ respect enough to keep the role of the Man of Steel.

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Kevin Spacey in Superman Returns

A recent interview with former Lex Luthor Kevin Spacey on the set of the HBO series Recount made an interesting, but questionable mention of his involvement in another Superman movie.

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The absolute why of this is unknown, though it may be related to relatively disappointing box office returns or the fact that Brandon Routh was terrible as Superman.

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Superman Returns Movie Poster

What defines a great superhero movie? Of course this is a topic that would spark a very heated and potentially violent debate if brought up in any comic book shop across America. It is also something that is very subjective, but there are a few things that very successful and beloved superhero films of the past have in common. In fact, I have narrowed it down to three specific elements that I believe to be necessary in making a great superhero flick. The first is that the film must have great action. Not good action, not lukewarm action, but GREAT action. It must contain the kind of action sequences that cause your back to stick the seat because you are sweating (and the sweating can not be related to any pre-existing conditions, a la obesity). A great superhero movie must also have performances by their lead actors that make us believe that these characters whom we loved so much in print are really coming to life. We cannot survive on actors who just look like our favorite heroes, they must also be able to walk in their shoes. And lastly these successful superhero films must have a story that keeps us yearning for more. We have read every comic, seen every animated episode, and we even have the bootlegged director’s cut of the 1970’s serial edition; we need more than just a rehashing of yesterday’s saga. All of these elements are absolutely necessary in making a superhero movie that will […]

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published: 12.17.2014
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published: 12.15.2014
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published: 12.12.2014
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published: 12.05.2014
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