Bill Paxton

Nightcrawler Movie

Someone will diagnose Louis Bloom soon enough, perhaps earmarking him as a straightforward sociopath, or pointing to certain tendencies that smack of Asperger’s Syndrome, or maybe he’ll even be written off of as someone with daddy issues, or mommy issues, or as someone just needs a hug. It doesn’t matter. Louis Bloom is a monster ripped from the pages of some modern fairy tale and splashed on to the big screen for audiences to forever delight in, even as he disgusts them. He’s an anti-hero for the ages, and the vessel that delivers him is a classic in the making. In Dan Gilroy’s directorial debut Nightcrawler, the screenwriter of such varied fare as The Fall and The Bourne Legacy takes on Los Angeles’ seedy underbelly with a fresh eye and a daring story, setting Jake Gyllenhaal as Louis “Lou” Bloom, a petty thief in need of a new career path. Lou is a lot of things: skinny, underfed, tired, resourceful, a fast talker, a quick study, a con man, a criminal and someone entirely without boundaries. Free of a social filter, Lou moves through the world in a different way than most people, and Gyllenhaal fully inhabits the role, slipping inside Lou seamlessly. It would be entirely terrifying if it weren’t so damn good.

read more...

Open Road Films

Last year we saw Jake Gyllenhaal‘s lose a significant amount of weight for his part in Dan Gilroy‘s Nightcrawler. When the film comes out this October people will likely be talking more about Gyllenhaal’s performance than how many LBs he lost. This is the project he dropped out of Into the Woods for, and it’s easy to see why. Gilroy’s script is an intense, darkly comedic, and flawlessly structured character study. It’s also Gyllenhaal’s juiciest role to date, playing an unforgettable character unlike anything we’ve seen from the actor before. The film largely takes place at night time in Los Angeles, where the seedy environments and protagonist, Louis Bloom (Gyllenhaal), dig right under your skin. This is an unsettling character operating in an even more unnerving world. He’s a freelance crime journalist, but calling him a journalist may be too kind; he’s basically a TMZ reporter for dead bodies.

read more...

Edge of Tomorrow

Too many blockbusters mistake moroseness for seriousness, often forgetting the key ingredient for a great summer movie: actual fun. Until now, this summer has been no different with its self-serious tentpole releases. Fortunately, director Doug Liman hasn’t forgotten how to craft real escapist entertainment, despite his last popcorn film Jumper suggesting otherwise. His latest, Edge of Tomorrow, is maybe his most accomplished work to date, a massive blockbuster with scale, heart, plenty of humor, and no shortage of coolness. This, ladies and gentleman, is what we call a summer blockbuster. In the not too distant future, non-Earthlings invade Earth. After a series of devastating blows, new forms of weaponry like the mecha suits in the film are employed. The poster child for the war and the mecha suits is Rita Vrataski (Emily Blunt), a great soldier who has earned the title “full metal bitch.” While she’s out there fighting the war in Europe, the wimpy Major William Cage (Tom Cruise) is back home promoting it. Cage has never seen a day in combat, but that changes when a higher up played by Brendan Gleeson sees Cage for what he is. Gleeson’s character sends Cage to the front lines of an attack, which, of course, does not sit well with the Major. His first few minutes on the battlefield don’t go so well: he dies. But as he does, a rare alien’s blood gets in his system, causing him to keep waking up before the slaughter has even happened. He lives again, dies again, lives again, dies again, and so on in a way that would make Phil Connors happy. Cage also […]

read more...

Tom Cruise and Bill Paxton in Edge of Tomorrow

Note: the following contains no spoilers for the movie beyond what happens in the first act, nor any more than you’ll find in a review. Still, feel free to go in blind and return here after seeing the movie if you wish. There are a few movies that Edge of Tomorrow obviously calls to mind. Groundhog Day is the big one, while the movie’s initial battle scene is reminiscent of Saving Private Ryan. The latter would be the more direct visual reference, almost remake rather than homage, but it’s really more than that. Within the plot, the battle is a literal redo of the Normandy landing, so it’s a double-layer repeat for a movie that’s already all about doing things over again. It definitely seems to be intentional, too, that Edge of Tomorrow opens in the U.S. on the 70th anniversary of D-Day. Another movie relevant to the appreciation of Edge of Tomorrow is Aliens. Both have Bill Paxton and both have an extraterrestrial threat. The casting of the actor here has to be connected to his appearance in the Alien sequel, and he has even stated presumption of as much in interviews. Specifically, though, he tends to mention just the alien link and that he was desired so that he could say, “Game over, Man!” Yet his character never does say that. He doesn’t need to, because there’s enough recall here to have the audience thinking of the line, so long as they’re familiar with the earlier movie and are consciously aware […]

read more...

Walt Disney Pictures

Once you’ve heard Bill Paxton scream, “Game over, man!” you can never unhear it. And that’s a good thing. He got to play big on camera throughout the ’80s, but hamming it up isn’t all he’s capable of as evidenced by a string of great dramatic roles in the ’90s including One False Move, A Simple Plan and Apollo 13. Years later he surprised people again with his directorial debut, Frailty, which made our list of one of the best horror films of its decade. He followed that film up with The Greatest Game Ever Played, a movie that clearly means a lot to Paxton despite its failure to find a wide audience. From 2006 to 2011 he played Bill Henrickson on HBO’s Big Love. He received considerable acclaim for his performance, but he once again found himself having to prove himself capable of range beyond that character once the show came to an end. It’s easy to get typecast, but to combat being put into a box, Paxton has taken on an eclectic set of supporting roles over the past few years, including this week’s Million Dollar Arm. With this Disney release, Agents of Shield, Edge of Tomorrow, and Dan Gilroy’s Nightcrawler, which I’ve heard nothing but excellent things about, 2014 is a good year for Bill Paxton. The actor spoke with us about his performance as USC pitching coach Tom House, as well as the highs and lows of the film business, the paradoxical nature of acting and more.

read more...

Godzilla 2014

In our shortest episode of the year, I take a minute to dissect the way gigantic things are being portrayed on screen and to consider how Godzilla is like the most recent doomsday climate change report. Plus, Jack interviews the legendary Bill Paxton who plays a pitching coach in Million Dollar Arm. They get philosophical about acting just above a whisper and going calmly over the top. Fortunately, the lurking Predator decides not to attack them in the process. You should follow Jack (@jackgi), the show (@brokenprojector), Geoff (@drgmlatulippe) and Scott (@scottmbeggs) on Twitter for more on a daily basis. Please review us on iTunes Download Episode #58 Directly Or subscribe Through iTunes

read more...

news bill paxton frailty

Whenever film lovers are asked which actor turned director they’d like to see get back behind the camera for a second film the top choice is quite frequently Charles Laughton. Unfortunately, Mr. Laughton passed away over half a century ago and won’t be following up The Night of the Hunter anytime soon. By contrast, Eddie Murphy is still alive, but no one is asking for a follow-up to Harlem Nights. One other name that frequently shows up on these lists is Bill Paxton, the beloved character actor, occasional leading man, and only performer to have been killed by a Terminator, a Predator, an Alien, and a Liberal with a knife. To be fair, even he doesn’t fit the criteria above as he’s already directed a second movie with 2005’s golf-related period film, The Greatest Game Ever Played. That movie is easily forgotten though, in part because it stars Shia LaBeouf, and in part because Paxton’s feature debut, Frailty, is so goddamn good. Seriously, if you haven’t seen it yet do yourself a favor and seek it out immediately. It even stars Matthew McConaughey, and you love him now. Finally, thirteen years after delivering that powerfully dark and twisted gem, Paxton is apparently ready to get dirty once again. Even better, he’s reuniting with Frailty‘s screenwriter, Brent Hanley, to adapt a Joe Lansdale novel. Keep reading for the details on this extremely welcome and kickass news.

read more...

paxton2

Agents of SHIELD was the new fall TV show that premiered with the largest amount of hype and carrying the burden of the largest amount of expectations this past year, and to understand why that was the case, one needs to look no further than the Marvel in its title. Not only was this a show that was being based off of a series of Marvel comics that had decades of history behind it and legions of pre-existing fans, but it was also going to be taking place in the ongoing Marvel Movie Universe, which has been putting gigantic hit after gigantic hit in the world’s multiplex theaters. Even more than that though, Agents of SHIELD was spinning right out of the events of The Avengers, which is one of the most successful movies ever made. It even had Avengers writer/director Joss Whedon attached to it as a producer and consultant, and a handful of his old cohorts from his TV days acting as showrunners and writers. This was probably the most sure-thing TV show that geek-types had ever seen. A funny thing happened after the show debuted though. Turns out nobody really liked it all that much, and over the course of the following weeks it got discussed less and less here on the Internet, which is a communications platform that was basically created so that we could look at naked people and discuss things like Agents of SHIELD.

read more...

review 2 guns

You’d be forgiven for walking into 2 Guns with modest expectations of it being little more than a passable buddy action/comedy. After all, this hasn’t exactly been a banner year for the sub-genre thanks to recent releases like R.I.P.D. and The Lone Ranger stinking up the movie houses, and beyond Paul Feig’s The Heat you’d be hard pressed to name an example that was even pretty good. But regardless of how you enter 2 Guns you’ll be walking out with a big goddamn smile on your face because this is one of the most consistently entertaining buddy cop movies in years. Bobby (Denzel Washington) is an undercover DEA agent paired up with an undercover Navy officer named Stig (Mark Wahlberg), and they’re both working against the clock to take down a murderous Mexican drug lord. Their plan hits a few snags though, chief among them the fact that both men think the other is actually a criminal, but vying for that top position is a robbery that sees the duo on the hook for over forty million dollars in dirty money. Disowned by their respective agencies and on the run from both the good guys and the bad guys, Bobby and Stig are forced to work together if they want to make it out of this mess alive. Look, I didn’t say it was all that original, but that doesn’t stop it from being a hell of a lot of fun.

read more...

paxton

What a shocking headline, right? When Bill Paxton briefly mentioned Predator 2 during our discussion at Comic-Con yesterday, I could see him cringe with a self-knowing smile about it. He didn’t discuss that 90s classic in detail, sadly, but Paxton clearly lit up when discussing his directorial work. It’s unfortunate Paxton has only made two films behind the camera. Frailty is a terrific family-oriented horror movie, while his Disney “golf picture,” The Greatest Game Ever Played, was overlooked by both critics and audiences. The box-office performance of The Greatest Game Ever Played is probably a reason why Paxton hasn’t directed a feature-length film in eight years, but he’s been keeping busy, both acting and developing projects. When Paxton isn’t working, taking pictures with fans, gladly receiving hugs, or hanging with his daughter — who I mistook as his publicist, surely her dream job — Paxton took a few minutes discuss Seven Holes for Air with me at Comic-Con, a digital comic he’s presenting. Seven Holes for Air is drama about a sick man’s man often represented through the prism of a stylized spaghetti Western, written by John McLaughlin. It’s a story Paxton is hoping to adapt one day, but in the meantime, it’s out there for people to discover.

read more...

trailer 2 guns

Hey everyone… we’re finally getting a new buddy cop movie! Kind of. The genre was an industry unto itself throughout the ’80s and into the ’90s, but somewhere along the line Hollywood stopped producing them. Or they at least stopped producing good ones. (I’m looking at you Cop Out.) The drought may be ending this summer though as we’re getting two high profile buddy cop flicks. First up is the Sandra Bullock/Melissa McCarthy comedy The Heat on June 28th, and then in early August things kick in to high gear with 2 Guns. The Baltasar Kormákur-directed film stars Denzel Washington and Mark Wahlberg as good guys playing bad guys who don’t know that the other is actually a good guy too. Crazy! An assignment goes awry, and the two are forced to work together to bring down the real bad guy. Explosions and insults ensue. Check out the first trailer for 2 Guns below, but be warned… it’s the entire movie in three minutes.

read more...

The Colony

The world is frozen, Laurence Fishburne and Bill Paxton are arguing about whether to go on a suicide mission, but the men of The Colony have a bigger problem: there’s only one woman. Watching the trailer for the sci-fi flick, this is the question I couldn’t get out of my head. Will they broach the prospect that after working so hard to survive, the species is going to die out because they didn’t think to bring some more women along for Cowboy Larry’s wild ride? Or will the whole thing blithely play out as all movies like this do? Probably that second one because feral people threatening to bite into your cheek makes it hard to focus on the longgame. Check out the trailer for yourself:

read more...

Bill Paxton

Bill Paxton has had a career for the ages. He’s taken multiple beatings at the hands of Arnold Schwarzenegger, he’s played cowboy with Kurt Russell, played astronaut with Tom Hanks, and even fought off aliens with Sigourney Weaver. One thing he’s never gotten a chance to do is share scenes with fellow superstar Tom Cruise, though, so the actor has decided to go back to his alien killing ways in order to make that happen. Variety is reporting that Paxton is in negotiations to become the latest name to join director Doug Liman’s (The Bourne Identity) upcoming, Japanese graphic novel adapted feature, All You Need is Kill. The basic story here is a kind of mix between Starship Troopers and Source Code, in that Cruise is playing a soldier in a war against aliens who keeps reliving the day he’s killed over and over again. As time keeps looping, and as Cruise keeps re-experiencing his death, he slowly learns from his mistakes and becomes a better soldier. It’s like if you gave Bill Murray’s character from Groundhog Day a big gun and told him to focus on fending off an alien invasion instead of buying Michael Shannon tickets to Wrestlemania.

read more...

Moving away from the feature-length hand sanitizer commercial that was this year’s Contagion, director Steven Soderbergh returns to the screen with another one of his trademark all-star cast outings, but one with significantly more ass-kicking delivered at the hands (and feet) of a particularly-picked leading lady. In Haywire, Soderbergh lets loose cinematic newcomer Gina Carano, a real-life MMA fighter who can more than hold her own with the boys club that rounds out the film’s cast (including Ewan McGregor, Channing Tatum, Michael Fassbender, Michael Douglas, Antonio Banderas, and Bill Paxton). Packaged as a double-crossing spy thriller, Haywire is big on impressive and crowd-pleasing fight scenes, but the film fizzles when it comes to delivering a particularly clever story for all those flying fists to play out against. The meat of Haywire’s plot is just a standard double-cross story that’s pumped up with the sort of stylistic flash and flair that Soderbergh can deliver handily. Carano plays a highly skilled ex-Marine who now works in the “private sector” on black ops jobs that involves messy endeavors like extraction and assassination. Carano’s Mallory Kane is very good at her job, good enough that she’s often a special request (an “essential element”) for a number of her company’s various contracts, a fact that irks her boss and ex-flame Kenneth (McGregor). Mallory is dispatched for an extraction job in Barcelona that goes well enough, but her performance there directly leads into her next job, a gig that’s ostensibly presented as glorified babysitting, done in […]

read more...

In the year 1984 a cybernetic organism is sent back from the future on a mission to kill a present-day diner waitress named Sarah Connor who will play a major role in the development of a war between man and machines in a post-apocalyptic future, because her son leads a rebellion of soldiers on the cusp of destroying the machines once and for all. The mentality is that in order for the machines to save their existence they must erase Sarah’s son John Connor from ever having existed and so they send back one of their own in order to kill Sarah before she can give birth to John.

Sent back by John to protect his mother from the cyborg is Kyle Reese who stands as Sarah’s only hope for survival against a tireless killing machine that will not stop until she’s dead and the future of mankind along with her.

read more...
Some movie websites serve the consumer. Some serve the industry. At Film School Rejects, we serve at the pleasure of the connoisseur. We provide the best reviews, interviews and features to millions of dedicated movie fans who know what they love and love what they know. Because we, like you, simply love the art of the moving picture.
Fantastic Fest 2014
6 Filmmaking Tips: James Gunn
Got a Tip? Send it here:
editors@filmschoolrejects.com
Publisher:
Neil Miller
Managing Editor:
Scott Beggs
Associate Editors:
Rob Hunter
Kate Erbland
Christopher Campbell
All Rights Reserved © 2006-2014 Reject Media, LLC | Privacy Policy | Design & Development by Face3