Battle Beyond the Stars

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Unwrap the first bite of FSR’s newest, and possibly most ill-advised podcast: Junkfood Cinema. You’ve heard plenty of cyber banter on the “true classics,” on what’s popular in film now, and about projections for movies yet-to-come. Junkfood Cinema is a shame-free celebration of those films that have managed to slip through the cracks of time; the lost children of the medium. These are films relegated to mainstream obscurity, and most even erroneously dubbed as “terrible.” To ravenous genre consumers like me and screenwriter/novelist C. Robert Cargill, there is nothing more satisfying then gorging on cult and exploitation gems with the mad gluttony of a pre-dawn fourth meal. For the first auditory iteration of FSR’s long-running b-movie column, we  issue the show’s cheese-soaked, deep-fried mission statement and then wax affectionate over one of their absolute favorite movies: Roger Corman’s Battle Beyond the Stars. We hope you enjoy the new Junkfood Cinema podcast. It’s so good, it just has to be bad for you. You should follow Brian (@Briguysalisbury), Cargill (@Massawyrm), and the show (@Junkfoodcinema). Download Episode #1 Directly

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This Week in DVD

It’s my birthday this week, and it therefore seems only fitting that the BUY section is overflowing with fantastic and fun titles worth picking up and enjoying with your friends, families, and parole officers. They even represent a pretty good blend of genres with horror (Insidious, [Rec]2), animated kid fare (Rango), and some classics from the silent era (Buster Keaton). Other titles out this week include The Lincoln Lawyer, Arthur, Battle Beyond the Stars and more. As always, if you see something you like, click on the image to buy it. Buster Keaton: The Short Films 1920-1923 Charlie Chaplin may be the most famous name of the silent film era, but equally beloved and far less controversial is the man behind Cole Abaius’s favorite film, The General. Buster Keaton had a long career both before and after that Civil War-themed classic, and this newly remastered set includes all nineteen of his solo shorts along with a roaring freight train full of extras. The shorts are filled with sharp comedy and incredible physical stunts with some of the best being One Week, The Goat, and Cops. The extras include visual essays, deleted scenes, two additional shorts that see Keaton sharing the screen with the likes of Chaplin, Harold Lloyd, and Fatty Arbuckle, and newly recorded audio commentary with Keaton himself. Okay, that last one isn’t true, but this is still a brilliant collection.

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junkfood-beyondthestars

Brian Salisbury is back with another movie so bad, it’s also good. This time he dips into the catalogue of Roger Corman and unearths a galactically-bound remake of The Seven Samurai.

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