Back To The Future

Back to the Future Part II Documentary

Pretty soon, there’ll be a whole genre of documentaries just about or related to Back to the Future. Among the fandom-based projects that show up on crowdfunding sites, Robert Zemeckis’s time travel trilogy seems to be tied to the most. There are the successfully Kickstarter-funded DeLorean-focused films Back in Time and DeLorean: Living the Dream, and there are the less successful, such as the Indiegogo-hosted The Time Machinists. I’m sure I’ve spotted more out there, and yet we haven’t seen any show up as finished and released yet. Maybe they’re all waiting for 2015? The latest, titled Back to the Future Again,is also aiming for next year, specifically because it’s about the technology “promised” for 2015 by Back to the Future Part II. This one is on Kickstarter with a goal of £403,160 ($675,365.73), which is the highest amount for this lot. More than half of that budget, though, goes directly to licensing clips and music from the movie in order to properly illustrate their comparison of what 2015 is supposed to look like, based on the movie’s estimation, and what it actually looks like. The rest goes toward making the doc itself, which will explore how far off we are from BTTF2‘s technology. When will we have flying cars and and self-lacing sneakers and hoverboards and hydrators, etc.? Back to the Future Again will also tackle the culture of the movie’s 2015, too, by talking to fashion designers about not just the science behind Marty Jr.’s footwear and clothes but also […]

read more...

backtothefuture_movieswelove

Time travel stories are one of the most polarizing things for film fans. They either love them, or they turn their noses up at them. Still, that doesn’t stop writers from coming up with them, and it’s not even for the science fiction fields. Time travel stories have an unexpectedly strong placement in romance fiction as well, such as The Time Traveler’s Wife or the upcoming Starz series Outlander, based on Diana Gabaldon’s best-selling historical romance series. While many of these romance-driven stories – like Somewhere in Time and more recently Richard Curtis’s About Time – are not concerned with the greater implications of meddling with the space-time continuum, the science fiction movies are. Traveling through time has been a central figure in stories for years, often presenting the viewer with a crash course in theoretical physics and opening themselves up to plot holes almost impossible to close. As a personal fan of the time traveling story, I love to see what the writers will come up with next. But these movies always get me wondering… is it possible to travel through time the way people do in the movies?

read more...

Almost Famous - Stillwater

In the wake of the untimely passing of Philip Seymour Hoffman, we here at FSR were asked to think of our favorite Hoffman performance. I immediately thought of his portrayal of rock journalist Lester Bangs in Almost Famous which got me thinking about the band Stillwater which William (Patrick Fugit) ends up following on tour. Stillwater is a fictional band created for Almost Famous, but they feel like anything but fiction, instead coming across as a real band just starting to climb the charts, easily existing alongside The Who and Black Sabbath (the band they opened for in the film). So what was it about Stillwater that made them feel like a real life band and not one simply created to help drive the story?

read more...

Back to the Future

For those who are fans of the seminal 1985 time travel spectacular Back to the Future, but maybe thought it needed more singing and dancing, today’s your lucky day. Bob Gale, the screenwriter who brought all three films of the Future trilogy to the screen, has announced that he, along with Robert Zemeckis, is bringing a Back to the Future Musical to London’s West End Theater. In the announcement, posted on BTTF.com, Gale said that he and Zemeckis have been working on the musical for over a decade, and have created a show that “captures the spirit of the film without being a slavish remake.” You will give us an Enchantment Under the Sea dance break, Gale. You will give it to us now.

read more...

bttf2truth-1

Contrary to what a dozen or so faulty Facebook memes say, we have not reached the day that Marty McFly (Michael J. Fox) and Doc Brown (Christopher Lloyd) travel to in Back to the Future: Part II. That won’t happen until next year, on Wednesday, October 21, 2015, to be exact. However, as we look ahead to that day in all of its post-Avengers 2 and pre-Star Wars 7 glory, we can assess what still needs to happen for the 2015 of 1989 to become a reality. Obviously we don’t have hoverboards or Mr. Fusion Home Energy Reactors in every kitchen, but revisiting the classic Back to the Future series got me thinking: Is any of the stuff we saw happening yet?

read more...

Back to the Future 4

I was minding my own business while taking a walk through my neighborhood when suddenly three booms announced the appearance of a Delorean that I could have sworn wasn’t there before. The gull-wing doors extended up as a harried Bob Gale, screenwriter of the Back to the Future trilogy, stepped out. “You’ve gotta come back with me!” he implored. “Where?” I asked, attempting to ignore for the moment the rare sight of a Delorean. “Back to the future,” he said. “Something’s gotta be done about the sequel!” Before I knew it I was traveling with him to several years in the future… to learn the history of an impending catastrophe.

read more...

Back to the Future

All this week, Film School Rejects presents a daily dose of our favorite articles from the archive. Originally published in August 2011, Kevin Carr celebrates a Movie We Love, Back to the Future. Fitting, as today is November 12, the 58th anniversary of the famous Hill Valley Thunderstorm… Marty McFly is just your typical high school kid who has his own rock band, rides a skateboard to school every day and wants to make out with his girlfriend in his own car on the weekend. He also has a inexplicably close relationship with zany Doc Brown down the road, but that’s all okay because that guy has just invented a time machine out of a sports car. After the terrorists that gave Doc Brown the plutonium to get the time machine working come after them with big guns, Marty travels back to 1955 where he meets his parents, accidentally stops them from falling in love and must find a way to get them back together before he disappears from existence.

read more...

IntroOvernight

Everyone has had one of those insane nights that you couldn’t have possibly planned for in a million years. It usually ends with you walking home barefooted or, at the worst, discreetly burying a camelback trunk filled with human remains. Point is, it’s harder to appreciate when this happens in film, so now I present to you 14 surprise movie nights that – for better or for worse – definitely had to suck for the characters involved.

read more...

aero

“Movie Houses of Worship” is a regular feature spotlighting our favorite movie theaters around the world, those that are like temples of cinema catering to the most religious-like film geeks. This week, FSR’s Allison Loring chose one of her favorite theaters in Los Angeles. If you’d like to suggest or submit a place you regularly worship at the altar of cinema, please email our weekend editor. Aero Theater Location: 1328 Montana Avenue, Santa Monica, CA Opened: Originally opened in 1939 as a 24-hour theater for aircraft workers, but closed in 2003 after Robert Redford’s Sundance Cinemas project (which was going to take over ownership of the theater) fell through because General Cinemas (which was being sold to AMC) went bankrupt. The Aero is now officially known as the “Max Palevsky Aero Theater” thanks to Palevsky’s funding for the American Cinematheque’s refurbishment of the theater which re-opened in January 2005. No. of Screens: 1 Current First-Run Titles: Prisoners Repertory Programming: The Aero always has special series going on – this month includes “Classics from the Cohen Film Collection” starting with Intolerance,“Satyajit Ray Restored” screening a slew of the filmmaker’s films including Charulata, The Music Room, The Big City, The Expedition, The Goddess, The Hero, The Coward, The Holy Man, The Adventures of Goopy and Bagha, and The Elephant God, and “Pure and Impure: The Films of Pier Paolo Pasolini” showing Accattone, Mamma Roma, The Decameron, Salò, or the 120 Days of Sodom, and The Gospel According to St. Matthew. Special Events: Jon Favreau is a regular at the Aero (since it is his neighborhood theater) and almost […]

read more...

Adam West Batman

The morning’s best writing from around the movie website-o-sphere. Just leave a tab open for us, will ya?

read more...

IntroMadGenius

Crazy science is so embedded in movie-making that it’s been with us since the very conception of film with such classics as Frankenstein and Dr. Caligari. While the best stuff was almost exclusively from the time of black and white – the 1980s and beyond have seen their formidable share of folks with PhDs in crazy. See for yourself…a lot of mad doctorates have been handed out recently.

read more...

bttf doc

Documentaries on specific circles of fandom are nothing new. Ever since the 1997 film Trekkies hit big at art house cinemas (and maybe before that in the UK with Dalekmania), we’ve been treated to similar looks at followers of Lord of the Rings, Star Wars, Indiana Jones, My Little Pony, The Rocky Horror Picture Show, Alien, Firefly/Serenity, The Big Lebowski, John Hughes and the horror, sci-fi and fantasy genres in general. And that’s just the movie and TV obsessions (we can go back further for, say, heavy metal fans interviewed in parking lots). The fandom doc subgenre will only be growing now thanks to crowdfunding, because there’s seemingly no easier kind of project to appeal to a large niche crowd than something about a subject that appeals to a large niche crowd. It’s the same reason two of the most successful campaigns we’ve highlighted here are those involving Superman and Batman. Next in line for such a documentary is the fanbase for Back to the Future. While not as well known or unified a devotion as those to Star Trek and some of the other properties that have gotten the treatment in the past, BTTF fandom is still quite big. There have been conventions and obsessive websites and demand for replicas of props like the self-lacing sneakers and hoverboards and flux capacitors. The biggest collector’s item for any BTTF fan, though, is a DeLorean, whether one actually used in the movie or just simply one of the rare originals from the short-lived […]

read more...

IntroResurrections

Because Jesus. Also, The Walking Dead hit its season finale on the same day everyone celebrated the most famous resurrection, so it seemed like the right subject for this week’s list. Everyone loves a good underdog story, and there’s no bigger obstacle to overcome than death, right? Coming back from the dead is a hell of a trick, and while there’s the usual reasons like a witch doctor or vampirism or converting into some kind of stupid blue ghost, sometimes an idea will come along that stands out from the norm – mostly because it’s a little silly in concept. That isn’t to say it’s bad. No, it’s just… not very profound. For example:

read more...

Exactly one billion years ago today, a group of settlers had an early dinner with the Wampanoag Native American tribe before playing an unsettling game of touch football in their back yard. They then went to the local merchant to stand in line for many hours in hopes of purchasing an item for slightly less than what it will cost the following day, thus completely justifying the enormous emotional distress of doing so. Today we honor this tradition by having a dinner with friends and family to celebrate the unification of mankind before going to the mall and doing the exact opposite of that. But hey, it could be weirder. For example, the following:

read more...

Back to the Future

Robert Zemeckis‘ long awaited return to live action filmmaking hits theaters soon, and in celebration of the fact Harkins Theaters hosted an online poll to find the director’s most popular movie. There was apparently a glitch of some kind… how else can you explain the fact that Used Cars didn’t win in a landslide? Instead the utterly fantastic and timeless Back to the Future was chosen, and tonight, the Harkins Valley Art theater in Tempe AZ is featuring a free screening of the Michael J. Fox comedy classic. The film will be presented via a pristine digital print, and the screening will be followed by a discussion of Zemeckis’ career alongside giveaways of Flight-related merchandise and swag. Check out the complete details below, and if you go make sure to get there early!

read more...

“In a perfect world, ‘The Cabin in the Woods’ would be a lock for a Best Original Screenplay nomination.” – Joey Magidson, The Awards Circuit It must be frustrating to write for an awards blog (aka an Oscar blog, since the Academy Awards are always the main focus of these sites), and know that the best films of the year are not necessarily the ones that will be nominated. Magidson’s comment above, from his April review of The Cabin in the Woods, sort of sums that up. But at the same time I don’t know if the movie truly deserves the statement. Something to consider, semantically speaking, is that the Academy’s award is not for “Most Original Screenplay” but “Best Original Screenplay.” This isn’t to say that the script, by Joss Whedon and Drew Goddard, isn’t well-written, and you’re welcome to argue its case for a nomination. Is it the best-written original screenplay of the year, though? All my time as a movie lover and watcher of the Oscars, including the past few years of hate-watching, the original screenplay category is one I’ve constantly been excited about. It’s the place where you could find some of the more clever and creative efforts, including a number of films that might not get other nominations. You could find a good number of interesting foreign films outside of the foreign-language award ghetto (such as Bunuel‘s two nominations for writing), as well as an interesting showing of mainstream and blockbuster fare, especially in the […]

read more...

In the new movie Pitch Perfect, a boy (Skylar Astin) introduces a girl (Anna Kendrick) to The Breakfast Club. It’s a believable scene, on it’s own. Even if I don’t necessarily think the 27-year-old John Hughes film, classic status notwithstanding, is a hugely important thing to the generation currently heading into college, I can accept that the guy is a movie soundtrack dork who seemingly loves only titles from before his birth and that she genuinely has never seen it. But it is a bit much that the signature Brat Pack film’s ending, with its iconic Simple Minds tune and Judd Nelson freeze-framed fist thrust, is played over and over, and the film figures so prominently into the romantic plot throughout. It all just feels like something from out of the mind of a thirty-something screenwriter rather than that of these modern-day teen characters. And the movie’s writer, Kay Cannon, is indeed a child of the ’80s and admits that The Breakfast Club is something she loves from her youth. Apparently, though, Say Anything was originally the teen movie of that era to be honored and made fun of in the new a-cappella-based comedy. She also is a big fan of Hughes’s Weird Science but couldn’t make it work. But for kids born around 1995, which is the target audience as well as the roles on screen, aren’t there more relevant films to reference? Maybe Mean Girls, Bring It On, Twilight, Rushmore, Juno, High School Musical, Superbad or — going […]

read more...

Reject Recap: The Best of Film School Rejects

To paraphrase Loverboy, everybody’s waiting for the weekend… to read the best original movie-related content on the web. So, come on baby, let’s go back to the start and give the past week of Film School Rejects a second chance. But first, we want to remind you of the category links on this page that will help you find the most recent reviews (including new releases Dredd 3D, End of Watch and The Perks of Being a Wallflower) and trailers (new spots for The Hobbit and The Life of Pi included) as well as the sidebar of all your favorite columns. And, of course, this week brought the start of Fantastic Fest, so you’ll want to look back on what films we’ve covered so far, such as Frankenweenie and Holy Motors. Keep this link handy through the next five days or so.

read more...

What is Movie News After Dark? It’s a nightly thing about stuff, and whatnot. We begin this evening with the most entertaining image I found on the internet today, a mash-up know known as The Tardis DeLorean, it’s the ultimate time travel device. Probably bigger on the inside and definitely not in need of any roads. Come along, Marty!

read more...

Matrix Origin

This content series is in partnership with smartwater. smartwater, good taste travels well. Click here to learn more. Where do movies come from? At the risk of sounding like Lucas from Empire Records (although “What’s with today, today?” is a perfectly valid question), there’s something genuinely incredible about the spark that leads to a multi-million dollar piece of art, crafted by thousands of people that a massive audience can enjoy. Someone reads a book or hears a story or finds an old family heirloom in a basement. Someone wants to recognize a figure that made a profound impact on our world. Someone stumbles across an old idea or has a Eureka Moment in the shower. It all gets put through the ringer and ends up as the only source of light in a darkened room. So, yes, there’s a magic to it all. Movies take their ideas from anywhere and everywhere (including other works of art and other movies). To celebrate that, here are five great films made just a bit more incredible by exploring where they come from.

read more...
NEXT PAGE  
Twitter button
Facebook button
Google+ button
RSS feed

published: 04.18.2014
C-
published: 04.18.2014
C
published: 04.18.2014
B+
published: 04.18.2014
A

Listen to Junkfood Cinema
Some movie websites serve the consumer. Some serve the industry. At Film School Rejects, we serve at the pleasure of the connoisseur. We provide the best reviews, interviews and features to millions of dedicated movie fans who know what they love and love what they know. Because we, like you, simply love the art of the moving picture.
SXSW 2014
Game of Thrones reviews
Got a Tip? Send it here:
editors@filmschoolrejects.com
Publisher:
Neil Miller
Managing Editor:
Scott Beggs
Associate Editors:
Rob Hunter
Kate Erbland
Christopher Campbell
All Rights Reserved © 2006-2014 Reject Media, LLC | Privacy Policy | Design & Development by Face3