Alamo Drafthouse

Austin Cinematic Limits

I received ton of emails after my “What Works for Austin Filmmakers?” post last week, which provided me with motivation to continue on with part two this week. One thing is obvious, this is a very touchy and emotional subject. Several filmmakers contacted me with their personal insights, all of which will appear one way or another in this or subsequent posts. Some emails were critical of certain members of the local film community, but I will not mention anyone’s names. My goal is to do whatever I can to help foster a more supportive and successful film community, so I am not here to get in the middle of any personal grievances. I do think there is a certain level of validity in many of the claims, but I will keep the criticisms as general as possible. So, I ended my last post with my thoughts on micro-budget genre films and promised to discuss comedies next. Comedies have long been a part of micro-budget filmmaking (especially student films), but most of the time these comedies lack a strong script and passable production quality. Austin is extremely lucky in that it has a very talented go-to pool of comedic actors (I’m looking at you, Chris Doubek, John Merriman, Kerri Lendo, Ashley Spillers, Heather Kafka, Kelli Bland, Paul Gordon and everyone else whom I am forgetting at this particular juncture), but its the films with impressive writing and production values that have historically achieved a higher level of success. This is how […]

read more...

Junkfood Cinema - Large

Welcome back to Junkfood Cinema; every bit as important as Time Cop. This is the Film School Rejects column celebrating movies that are damme stupid, damme shallow, and damme awesome! Every week we tear into a lovably bad film like it was a Belgian waffle, which by the way was the nickname of our indecisive foreign exchange roommate in college. We will roundhouse a cinematic stinky cheese in the face with mockery, making plenty of surprise sex faces in slow motion as we do so. But as we are kicking it, we are simultaneously revealing our fondness for these flicks; kicking in the face with the other foot the notion that they are without merit. It’s actually a very difficult maneuver that has us executing a groin-punishing mid-air split. As we ice down our tender bits, we will gorge ourselves on a nauseatingly tasty snack themed to the movie we just watched. This week, the Alamo Drafthouse played host to one of the most epic showcases of epic film epicness to ever be epic. In celebration of the impending/now(ish) release of The Expendables 2, a tribute to one of its newest cast members was conceived. Three classic Jean-Claude Van Damme films, at least as classic as that combination of words allows, would serve as the appetizer for the bloody bullet feast that was sure to be The Expendables 2.

read more...

Austin Cinematic Limits

P.J. Raval and Kelly Williams had barely unpacked from their trip to the Sundance Creative Producing Labs when IFP announced that Untitled Gay Retiree Documentary and Hellion were selected as part of its Project Forum for the 34th edition of Independent Film Week (September 16-20, 2012). Untitled Gay Retiree Documentary (directed by P.J. Raval, produced by Sara Giustini) was chosen in the Spotlight on Documentaries category which contains 49 other documentary features currently at an early financing stage to those nearing completion. Hellion (written and to be directed by Kat Candler, produced by Kelly Williams) will participate in the No Borders International Co-Production Market which includes 42 other narrative projects in development. Austin will be represented by a third film at IFP, Clay Liford‘s script-in-progress, Cutlet (written and to be directed by Clay Liford, produced by Angie Meyer and Brock Williams), which will participate in the Emerging Narrative section with 24 other feature scripts in development. The purpose of Independent Film Week is to provide opportunities for filmmakers to connect with financiers, executives, influencers and decision-makers who can help them complete their projects. A slate of 165 films were selected by IFP for this year’s Project Forum.

read more...

Cannes. Sundance. Toronto. SXSW. Screw them.* The best film festival each and every year is the Alamo Drafthouse Theater’s very own Fantastic Fest that takes place in Austin every fall. They bring genre films from around the world to play under one roof for fans of movies best described as strange, violent, unique, crazy and often absolutely incredible. These are movies that will most likely never get a DVD release in the US let alone a theatrical run making this fest the only real opportunity to see them (bar an import disc down the road). The first wave of titles have been announced with two more to come in the next several weeks, and the list offers the usual selection of the very unusual. Movies we’ve never heard of before will play alongside ones we know by heart. I for one am looking forward to seeing The Shining on the big screen for the first time as well as some of the new films below. Keep reading for the complete first wave! *I kid! All film festivals are awesome, period.

read more...

Klown Movie

The folks at that Alamo Drafthouse and Drafthouse Films don’t speak Danish — at least not that we know — but the stars of their latest acquisition, KLOWN, do. And they do so in a rather raunchy manner, creating hilarity all over the land. You don’t need to know Danish to enjoy the new “Don’t Talk” PSA featuring KLOWN stars Frank Hvam and Casper Christensen. It’s got subtitles for that. All you do need to do is be right here, right now. Because this is where it’s debuting. And as a bonus, we’ve got a line on how you can just jump right into watching KLOWN in its entirety online. The wonders of the internet!

read more...

Austin Cinematic Limits

I had no intentions of making this another “news” post (this was supposed to be a rambling soliloquy on micro-budget genre filmmaking in Austin), but shortly after I had published last week’s Austin Cinematic Limits column on The Latest Austin Movie Success Stories, I heard yet another fantastic Austin movie success story. Two of the eleven projects selected for the Sundance Creative Producing Labs this year are from Austin! Color me impressed…and incredibly proud. Kelly Williams (who was featured in Austin Cinematic Limits in February 2012) has been selected to participate in the Feature Film Creative Producing Lab, a five-day Lab where narrative feature film producers work with an accomplished group of Creative Advisors to develop their creative instincts, communication and problem-solving skills in all stages of film production. This year’s Creative Advisors include producers Anne Carey (The American, Adventureland), Karin Chien (Circumstance, Exploding Girl), Lynette Howell (Terri, Blue Valentine) and Paul Mezey (Beasts of the Southern Wild, Sugar). Williams was selected for his work on writer-director Kat Candler’s Hellion, which premiered at Sundance 2012 as a short film and is now in the early stages of being developed into a feature-length production.

read more...

Mondo LOTR

“Does anyone have any questions about Flipper?” Front and center, Mondo chief Justin Ishmael isn’t fooling anyone. Next to him is Elijah Wood, the star of the 1996 Alan Shapiro-directed Paul Hogan vehicle Flipper. But we know this can’t be Flipper. Not for the highly anticipated tenth Mondo Mystery Movie, a series that has spanned across shows in Austin and Los Angeles, each better than the last and each packaged with an amazing work of art that attendees have the exclusive opportunity to purchase. Even though Justin and Elijah insist that we’re all about to watch Flipper, this crowd of true believers — a crowd that, when asked who was in attendance for the last Mystery Movie, saw about 80% of hands raised — was having absolutely none of it. “So you guys are just going to shit on this event?” said Ishmael in a faux tiff. “Okay then, lets roll the movie.” And so began our screening of Flipper.

read more...

Austin Cinematic Limits

How many movie fans does it take to paddle down the Guadalupe River to a Drafthouse Films screening of Klown? Even after the Ultimate Klown Canoe Trip on Saturday, there’s still no answer for that. All I know is that film critics are much better at being witty and snarky than they are at canoeing. Nonetheless, the endless amounts of free beer definitely helped distract us from the fact that we were outside and exercising. The weather was even somewhat pleasant — low 90s and cloudy. Twitch’s Josh Hurtado and I did not know each other beforehand, but everyone else had already paired up and we were the odd men out. So, we grabbed our life jackets, paddles and canoe, hit the river and became fast friends. Right at the onset of our journey there was a massive pile up of canoes (and we had not even reached the “canoe-eating tree” yet!). Once we cleared ourselves of that mess, Josh and I opted to distance ourselves from the pack and never look back… We navigated the shallow river quite well — only having to get our feet wet a few times — and if it was a race, Josh and I won (just barely beating Tim and Karrie League who came out of nowhere in the closing quarter mile). Sure, we did not get to paddle in the pack of critics alongside Klown‘s Casper Christensen and Frank Hvam (though I did sit beside Hvam on the bus ride), but Josh […]

read more...

FRANKENWEENIE

The only thing in life better than Fantastic Fest would be winning the lottery while you’re at Fantastic Fest. Like every year, we’ll be covering the hell out of it with a preternatural dedication that often requires us writing our reviews with straight jackets on. That’s a lot harder than it sounds when you’re also singing karaoke and drinking a high quality concoction of hooch. The full fest line up hasn’t been announced yet, but it will undoubtedly be full of movie goodness, and the opening night film promises to set the tone. The flick? Tim Burton‘s forthcoming Frankenweenie – which promises a return to stop motion, a returning to working with John August and a return to a story from his youth that finally gets a feature-length treatment. The movie hits theaters October 5th, but Fantastic Fest attendees will see it before anyone else. Hopes are high here because Burton seems to have lost his way as of late, crafting stuff in his wheelhouse that feels stale, but perhaps the solution to the rut is to dig deeper into it. To return to the kind of magic this morbid magician built his name on. It’s a hell of a way to kick things off. And this poster for the fest is a great way to celebrate the end of everything:

read more...

What is Movie News After Dark? It’s like a nightly version of American Top 40, but with movies and no Casey Kasem. Actually, it’s nothing like American Top 40. It’s just about movies. We begin tonight with a piece of Drew Struzan’s The Thing poster for Mondo, all part of the Alamo Drafthouse’s Summer of 1982 series. Even though it’s reminiscent of the original poster for the film, it’s still quite cool. Movies.com also has a pretty solid interview with the postering legend, which you should read. And now, the news…

read more...

Boiling Point

I’m not afraid of a little capitalism. Hey, we all embrace it, working every day for the man in the city, or stealing shit. Unless you’re high on bath salts and living off the faces of hobos, you need money. People who have money want more money. Money makes the world go round. When people don’t make the money they think they deserve, or the money they want, or they just think that more money would be better, they complain about it. Hollywood is full of whiny babies, whether it’s studios, actors, directors, or theater  chains. They’re all obsessing over money. There are at least a dozen different boiling points that could be about money and who’s crying the most, but this one points the finger at the theater chains.

read more...

Austin Cinematic Limits

Summer is almost here. Are you still looking for something to keep your movie-loving kids (ages 9-18) busy this summer? Sure, you could drop them off at the multiplex every morning on your way to work, but allow me to recommend something much better — Austin Film Festival’s Summer Film Camp. Don’t worry, I am thinking exactly what you are thinking. “Why didn’t something like this exist when I was a kid?” Yeah, I know, kids have it so much easier nowadays! For example, I remember when I had to walk barefoot in the snow, uphill for ten miles to get to some lame-ass summer camp when I was a kid. Twenty years from now, do you really want your kids to be stuck in mindless office jobs reminiscing about their oh-so-boring childhoods while stressing out about what to do with their kids over the upcoming summer? Yes, that’s right, maybe if you enroll them in AFF’s Summer Film Camp they won’t grow up to have tedious office jobs; but, first and foremost, they certainly won’t have bad memories of their childhood summers.

read more...

If you live near an Alamo Drafthouse, you probably already know that Tim League, Zack Carlson, Lars Nilsen and co. have coordinated an amazing summer series devoted to the blockbusting year of 1982. If you’ve been reading FSR lately, you already know that our site co-sponsored a screening of George Miller’s Mad Max 2: The Road Warrior in coordination with the Drafthouse’s site-specific Rolling Roadshow series. And if you live anywhere within five hundred miles of the Thunderhill Raceway in Kyle, Texas, then you probably attended said screening. But for you feral kids who may have not had a chance to witness this awesome event, or for those of you that did, here’s a first-person account of the happenings by one of FSR’s own. The Road Warrior is something of a sweet spot in Mel Gibson’s history. The peak entry in the Mad Max series (sorry, Tina Turner), The Road Warrior gives us a Gibson who is too young, too unknown, and too accented to yet become a bona fide Hollywood star, but someone who has also (thanks largely to the first Mad Max film) developed enough charisma to be a magnetic force of nature onscreen. He’s hardly a man with no name, but Gibson’s one-man machine doesn’t need to say much – hell, he doesn’t even need both eyes – to give us a degree of intensity that hasn’t been seen before, or arguably since. Yes, Max is surrounded by several comic relief characters (notably the Gyro Captain, who […]

read more...

What is Movie News After Dark? Well, it ain’t like dusting crops, boy. Our fearless leader, Neil Miller is taking the night off and has left you in my very incapable hands. And thus we spring forth to the internet to see what new bounty of cinematic gifts that unfaithful mistress doth offer up to we lowly cinephiles. Or something like that. We begin, boys and girls, with Paul Thomas Anderson. For my money, he’s easily one of it not the very finest directors working today with apologies to Christopher Nolan. There Will Be Blood was quite frankly a masterpiece and my expectations are high for his next film, The Master. The folks over at Cigarettes and Red Vines got a nice exclusive today from the man himself, revealing a few behind the scenes photos of old fashioned negative cutting going on. Not only is this new PT Anderson film shooting on glorious celluloid but this particular negative was of the much higher quality 65mm variety. Word has it that the film will be comprised of both 35mm and 65mm elements, though the question remaining is will the distributor be willing to strike a 70mm print. Exhibition options for 70mm are scarce, but Oscilloscope Labs appears to be striking a 70mm print for Baraka follow-up Samsara. It appears the Weinstein’s are in charge of theatrical distro for The Master, hopefully they’ll have the courage to pony up for a 70mm print

read more...

Remember how we told you guys that, as part of the Alamo Drafthouse‘s totally rad Summer of 1982 Rolling Roadshow series, we’d be co-hosting a majestic screening of The Road Warrior that would actually include its own Thermonuclear Flaming Death Race? No? What, did you pass out when you first read the news because it was just that awesome? Wake up then, and start buying tickets for the event nownownow. On May 18, the Drafthouse’s Summer of 1982 screening series will descend on Kyle, Texas (located between Austin and San Antonio) for a very special 35mm Rolling Roadshow with Live Thermonuclear Flaming Death Race for The Road Warrior. Before the screening blows your face off, four fearless daredevil drivers will rev up their wheeled wasteland war machines for a FULL-TILT DESTRUCTION DERBY that will shatter the very Earth!!! Fire will scorch the sky as these no-future automaniacs shatter steel and bones! And also pre-movie entertainment will be provided by Austin’s “post-apocalyptic punk ayatollahs of rocknrolla” – ROCKATANSKY! It’s gonna pretty cool, you guys. Tickets are just fifteen dollars each and you can buy them HERE (along with other Summer of 1982 Roadshows currently on sale). After the break, check out details for this Roadshow, plus a very special new Road Warrior trailer, made just for this explosive event.

read more...

What is Movie News After Dark? It’s a nightly column that serves at the pleasure of the internet’s biggest film nerds. Currently those nerds are waiting with baited breath for the release of The Avengers. So why wouldn’t we turn a big, shiny lens toward Joss Whedon’s summer kick-off event film? Okay, lets do that… Now that The Avengers has already earned $260.5M overseas, it’s time for it to take over Movie News After Dark. As if it hasn’t been creeping its way in already. Tonight’s edition of the beloved movie news round-up column isn’t 100% populated by Avengers news, but it’s close enough. And it’s only Wednesday. We begin above with a shot from the film in question, featuring Thor (Chris Hemsworth) and Captain America (Chris Evans) in the midst of battle. Needless to say, this all has me yearning to see the film again. It’s quite fun.

read more...

Earlier this week, Deadline Wherever reported that during a panel at CinemaCon, exhibitors discussed the option of allowing patrons to text during films. It was pitched as an attempt to attract younger audiences to the theaters, even though it doesn’t actually address the reason (price of films, quality of the home video experience and rampant online piracy) why teens and college students don’t go to the movies as much as they did in the 70s and 80s. At Film School Rejects, we support a staunch no-texting policy (and no tweeting, Facebooking, web surfing, Wikipediaing, playing of Angry Birds or Fruit Ninja) at all theaters. However, instead of pointing out the fallacies of this idiotic suggestion, we’re taking a look into the future. Here is a possible timeline of what might happen were texting allowed in movie theaters. Gird your loins and enjoy this cautionary tale from Cole Abaius and Kevin Carr.

read more...

Boiling Point

Recently at CinemaCon, Amy Miles, the chief executive officer of Regal Entertainment, birthed the idea that movie theaters should maybe consider allowing texting at certain types of movies – basically movies that asshole teens would most likely be seeing. With great and obvious reasons, everyone got up in a tiff over the statement. Tim League, CEO of the Alamo Drafthouse Cinema, which has a famously hard-line stance against phone usage during screenings, responded appropriately: “Over my dead body will I introduce texting into the movie theater.” Granted, if you text during a movie, you’re an asshole, but is it really the worst thing in the world?

read more...

Perhaps the only thing that goes better with the Alamo Drafthouse than kick-ass movies are big, fiery explosions, so how convenient that, as part of this year’s epic Summer of 1982 screening series, the Drafthouse will combine both of those things for a very special Rolling Roadshow. And how even more convenient that they’ll be putting all that firepower behind a screening that Film School Rejects is co-hosting. You guys! A demolition derby? You shouldn’t have! On May 18, the Drafthouse’s Summer of 1982 screening series will descend on Kyle, Texas (located between Austin and San Antonio) for a very special 35mm “Rolling Roadshow with Live Thermonuclear Flaming Death Race” for The Road Warrior. You read that right. You want more? You’ll get more! Before the screening kicks into high gear, four fearless daredevil drivers will rev up their wheeled wasteland war machines for a FULL-TILT DESTRUCTION DERBY that will shatter the very Earth!!! Fire will scorch the sky as these no-future automaniacs shatter steel and bones! No, seriously, it’s going to be nuts. Even better? Pre-movie entertainment will be provided by Austin’s “post-apocalyptic punk ayatollahs of rocknrolla” – ROCKATANSKY! Want tickets to this very special Rolling Roadshow presentation of The Road Warrior as part of the Drafthouse’s epic Summer of 1982 screening series? Details (and the rest of that sweet poster) after the break!

read more...

Meeting Evil writer/director Chris Fisher joins us to talk about how necessary movie stars are to getting financing in the indie world (and how to talk to Samuel L. Jackson on set). Plus, we go beyond the headlines to explore the Alamo Drafthouse‘s expansion into New York City with CEO Tim League and to push the envelope of film festivals with Tribeca Executive Director Nancy Schafer. Download Episode #129

read more...
  PREVIOUS PAGE
NEXT PAGE  
Some movie websites serve the consumer. Some serve the industry. At Film School Rejects, we serve at the pleasure of the connoisseur. We provide the best reviews, interviews and features to millions of dedicated movie fans who know what they love and love what they know. Because we, like you, simply love the art of the moving picture.
Fantastic Fest 2014
6 Filmmaking Tips: James Gunn
Got a Tip? Send it here:
editors@filmschoolrejects.com
Publisher:
Neil Miller
Managing Editor:
Scott Beggs
Associate Editors:
Rob Hunter
Kate Erbland
Christopher Campbell
All Rights Reserved © 2006-2014 Reject Media, LLC | Privacy Policy | Design & Development by Face3