Adrien Brody

The Brothers Bloom

If you’re not convinced more Star Wars movies is a good idea, then the news that Rian Johnson will be writing and directing Star Wars Episode VIII should win you over. Johnson knows structure, action, comedy and character, making him the ideal filmmaker to make Star Wars fresh and exciting again. Not only do his talents make him the right filmmaker for the job, but so does his thematic interests. Looper and Johnson’s second picture, The Brothers Bloom, are about how much control someone has over their own narrative. Bloom (Adrien Brody) feels like he’s living a story written by his brother Stepehen (Mark Ruffalo), while Old Joe (Bruce Willis) and Young Joe (Joseph Gordon-Levitt) battle over the course of their shared, separate life. In short, a franchise focused on creating your own destiny is right up Johnson’s alley. Out of Johnson’s three films so far, The Brothers Bloom is the one that’s probably talked about the least. It was met with a lukewarm response from critics, and it kind of got lost in the shuffle back in 2009, but it’s a richly structured flim flam movie full of heart. It’s as much about brothers as it is the con. The relationship between Bloom and Stephen lives beyond the movie; Brody and Ruffalo let us learn these characters so thoroughly that it’s easy to imagine other adventures they’d gone on. We revisited the film with the commentary track on. Here’s what we learned.

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The Grand Budapest Hotel Review

As proven by all of his previous films, Wes Anderson understands comedy, drama, music, writing, and structure. He’s been lauded as having an original voice for comedy and drama, but one thing he doesn’t get enough credit for? His action chops. The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou, The Fantastic Mr. Fox, and his newest film, The Grand Budapest Hotel, all have their share of action, and each one of their set pieces are wonderful. They came in small doses usually, but The Grand Budapest Hotel is a full on action thriller, completely done with Anderson’s sensibilities. And an action movie from Wes Anderson is as delightful, and as busy, as it sounds. The film jumps around a few different moments in time, but it’s mainly set in the fictional Republic of Zubrowka during the 1920s. Zubrowka is the home of The Grand Budapest Hotel, a lavish establishment visited by old ladies who come solely for Monsieur Gustave H.’s (Ralph Fiennes) companionship. Gustave is the smoothest hotel concierge in all of Europe, and it’s easy to see why: he’s charming, he treats his clientele with the utmost respect, and, at least in some cases, he genuinely loves his guests. One of his most beloved is Madame D., a woman in her 80s who’s at her liveliest when she’s with Gustave. Soon after her visit she’s murdered, and Gustave is the #1 suspect in the case. Chased by Madame D’s son Dmitri (Adrien Brody), his ruthless sidekick Jopling (Willem Dafoe), and fascists led by a typecast Edward Norton, Gustave is forced […]

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The-Grand-Budapest-Hotel-Poster_header

Wes Anderson‘s latest foray into the world of forbidden love is a little more off-kilter than 2012’s sweet childhood romance Moonrise Kingdom. It’s not that Sam and Suzy’s budding union was all sunshine and butterflies; it’s just that The Grand Budapest Hotel‘s events are set off by a mustachioed Ralph Fiennes having relations with an 84 year-old Tilda Swinton. Fiennes plays a top-notch concierge named Gustave H., who takes on an apprentice and confidant to shadow him in all his endeavors. When Swinton’s wealthy heiress suddenly dies, all hell breaks loose as her gang of relatives come after him (“I go to bed with all my friends,” he purrs to her son Adrien Brody. Brave man.) as they realize she’s left some very valuable assets to him in her will. There’s also a small predicament that some believe that he may have murdered her as well. The film appears to be told through the eyes of Gustave’s apprentice, meaning we’re getting a look at a very ridiculous world of adults, even if he truly believes it to be serious and respectable. In true Andersonian fashion, the landscapes are lush, the hotel is ornate and the colors are vibrant; even if the situation is grim, it’s kind of a world you want to be immersed in. Favorite shot of an adult doing a silly task: Willem Defoe riding a motorbike with tiny goggles. Check out the trailer here:

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schwarzenegger

What is Casting Couch? It’s the casting news column that’s catching up on some developments that occurred over the weekend while preparing for tonight’s huge Stanley Cup Finals game. Find out what’s up with Adrien Brody and Felicity Jones before the puck drops. You’ve already seen him save the world from terrorists, aliens, and killer machines, and now it’s looking like you’re going to finally get the chance to see Arnold Schwarzenegger save the world from the oncoming creep of the zombie menace. Or, at least, he’s going to do his best to get his daughter through a zombie apocalypse, as that’s the plot of the latest project he’s taken on. According to Variety, the movie is called Maggie, it comes from a Black List script by strangely-named screenwriter John Scott 3, and it will see Schwarzenegger playing a father who is helping his daughter, “come to terms with her infection as she slowly becomes a zombie,” in what sounds like the most family-oriented role the action star has taken since he was in Junior.

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InAPPropriate Comedy

Perhaps the only thing you need to know about Vince Offer’s InAPPropriate Comedy is that (spoiler? can you spoil a film that you sincerely hope no one you’ve ever met sees? beware?) it ends with the reveal that everything that has taken place previously, every deeply unfunny sketch, every ham-fisted attempt at stirring up controversy, every minute of offensive material presenting itself as shocking cultural commentary, has taken place in Lindsay Lohan’s vagina. To be fair, about three minutes or so do take place in Offer’s wraparound storyline (one so nonsensical that it makes me regret ever poking even the tiniest of holes in the wraparound storyline of V/H/S, a film that should be lauded as one of the greatest cinematic achievements of our time in comparison to the wretched tripe that is InAPPropriate Comedy), which features the ShamWow spokesperson/director/writer living in a sewer where he operates some sort of magical iPad that apparently controls sketch comedy in Lindsay Lohan’s nether regions. Offer’s choice to place himself in a La-Z-Boy in an actual sewer is the only wise decision he makes in the entire outing, and it’s still weirdly indicative of the level of humor in InAPPropriate Comedy, which is to say, incredibly stupid and gross and totally convinced that it’s subversive and cool and insightful.

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Maggie Gyllenhaal

What is Casting Couch? It’s the casting news roundup that’s been out of work since casting agents seem to be treating the week between Christmas and New Years as one prolonged food coma. If there’s one thing that Jurassic Park taught us, it’s that nature finds a way. Well, casting finds a way too. In a week where there isn’t any news getting leaked to the trades, leave it to Albuquerque Business First to break a new scoop. The eagle eyes over at The Film Stage noticed that, in an article about how that Michael Fassbender-starring rock and roll comedy called Frank is coming to town to shoot, the local source managed to break the news that Maggie Gyllenhaal is coming to town with it. Her involvement in the film sees her joining a cast that includes not just Fassbender, but two of the young MVPs of 2012, Domhnall Gleeson and Scoot McNairy, as well. Which, you know, makes her one of the luckiest ladies in the world.

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Adrien Brody in High School

“I’m surprised this hasn’t happened sooner…” No truer words could represent the existence of John Stalberg Jr.’s High School, a film that sat on a shelf following a blistering run at Sundance in 2010, only to be released theatrically, in a very limited fashion, in June of this year. It’s the simple tale of two former friends whose paths have diverged in their later teen years. Henry Burke (Matt Bush) is the soon-to-be Valedictorian of his class, with a promising future awaiting him at M.I.T. Travis Breaux (Sean Marquette) is a burnout who spends more time wiping sharpie marker penises off his face than he does hitting the books. After a pre-school accident lands them together in detention, Breaux convinces Henry that his path to relaxation must go through the forrest of the sticky green, the cannabis sativa. And so they smoke marijuanna, not knowing that tomorrow will bring about a school-wide drug test at the hands of their overly theatrical dean, Leslie Gordon (Michael Chiklis). It’s here that the story gets interesting, and soon after the film finds itself introducing a mad, tattoo-covered dealer named Psycho Ed, as played by Adrien Brody. It’s here that High School becomes something quite special, indeed.

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Johnny Depp to Start in The Grand Budapest Hotel

Notoriously meticulous director Wes Anderson seems to be speeding up his usual development process – which generally produces a new film every three years – and putting together the pieces for his next project. Hot on the heels of his successful, pubescent kids dancing in their underwear movie, Moonrise Kingdom, comes The Grand Budapest Hotel, an Anderson-penned script that is said to feature an ensemble cast, but is a mystery as far as character breakdowns or synopsis are concerned. News of the new Anderson project broke a little over a week ago, when Twitch reported they’d heard the director had begun casting on a new film, and that he was in various stages of negotiations with Johnny Depp, Owen Wilson, Bill Murray, Edward Norton, Jude Law, Jeff Goldblum, Adrien Brody, Willem Dafoe, and Angela Lansbury. A list of names that talented and notable may sound like wishful thinking, but a report from Deadline Clute now confirms that at least some of it is true. Not only did they get their hands on the title of the film, but they’re also reporting that Depp has been wrapped up and is officially set to star.

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Let’s face it, we exist as a generation that has grown up on stoner comedies. There have been drugs in our movies since before we were off the teet. So we should have seen it all by now, right? Not exactly.

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Adrien Brody in HIGH School

It feels like forever since we first reported on John Stalberg Jr.’s HIGH School at Sundance back in January 2010, but such is life in the big city. The distribution game is a tough one and once a film is sold, it could end up on a shelf for any amount. Thankfully, Anchor Bay is bringing this one off the shelf and into theaters this summer. June 1, 2012 to be exact. For those who need some catch-up, it’s a film that yours truly called “a stoner comedy worthy of being mentioned in the same paragraph as both Dazed and Confused and the great John Hughes. It’s funny, unpredictable and filled with performances that are as bankable as they big name stars who’ve disappeared into them.” One of those great performances comes from Adrien Brody, who becomes the crazed drug-dealing legend known only as Psycho Ed. You get a little taste of his madness in this newly released green band trailer, which doesn’t quite get as wild as what we saw in the film’s red band trailer, but you get the idea. Between Brody’s brilliance and an equally immersed performance from Michael Chiklis (yeah, that is Michael Chiklis), it’s no wonder this film ended up on my Editor’s Picks list for 2010. And now you all get to see it, as well. So start with the trailer after the jump and mark June 1 on your calendars. We’ll keep you updated from there.

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Director Tony Kaye (American History X) returns to American cinema with his Detachment, a new film that also focuses on the maligned and the angry – American teenagers. Not quite kidding. The film stars Adrien Brody as “Henry Barthes, a substitute teacher who conveniently avoids any emotional connections by never staying anywhere long enough to form a bond with either his students or colleagues. A lost soul grappling with a troubled past, Henry finds himself at a public schoolwhere an apathetic student body has created a frustrated, burned-out administration.” The film’s relatively simple plotline hides what’s at the root of Detachment – it’s an unexpectedly unique film with a very different worldview on modern relationships and the teacher/student dynamic. Dead Poets Society this is not. In an exclusive clip from the film, some of the less charming of Barthes’ students are on full display in an altercation with the school principal involving one seriously mistreated Christina Hendricks. And just who is doing the mistreatment? Those terrifically awful teenagers. Remember how awful high schoolers can be with the clip after the break.

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Director Tony Kaye‘s debut was 1998’s stunning tour de force, American History X. The film stars Edward Norton as a recovering skinhead trying to set things right in the present while remembering his misdeeds of the past, and if you haven’t seen it I can’t recommend enough that you stop reading and seek it out immediately. It’s an incredibly affecting film anchored by a tremendous performance from Norton. Sadly, Edward Furlong also stars. Kaye and Norton had a very public falling out during the film’s post-production, and the director seemingly vanished into thin air in the decade-plus since. Except he’s actually been making films at a steady pace. You just most likely haven’t seen them. Now thirteen years after reportedly trying to remove his name from American History X (and replace it with Humpty Dumpty) Kaye’s latest film looks to return him to the limelight. The critically acclaimed indie Detachment stars Adrien Brody as a man who chooses to avoid personal connections as the ones he was born with begin slipping away. A dead mother, a father falling into dementia…he avoids intimacy to avoid the pain, until his latest teaching assignment finds him forming an unexpected bond. Check out the clip below, and head over to the film’s official site for more info.

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Imagine you’re trapped in a car with a wild-eyed Adrien Brody. And you’re dressed like Halle Berry on Oscar night. Scary isn’t it? Now erase that disturbing image from your head, and instead imagine waking up in a wrecked car in the middle of nowhere, with no recollection of how you got there or even who you are, and no clue how you’re going to get out alive. A man (Adrien Brody) opens his eyes to find he’s seated in the passenger seat of a still smoking crashed car. Part of his body is trapped beneath the crumpled dash, his head is battered and bruised, and he can feel the steady pulse of blood seeping from his shattered leg. He surveys his surroundings through blurred eyes and sees nothing but deep forest ahead and to either side and a steep embankment behind. And he’s all alone. Alone… except for two dead bodies, a gun beneath his seat, a hungry mountain lion, a mysterious visitor or two, and a gnawing suspicion that he may just be a very bad man.

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Woody Allen built a legendary career and a pretty hefty catalogue of films by making movies set in New York. His movies not only told the stories of people from New York talking like New Yorkers while walking around New York, they also just seemed to have some extra New Yorky something going on with them. Recently he has started making movies set in London, and while they are never really panned by critics, all anybody can ever say about them is that they don’t hold up to classic Woody. With this film we see Woody trying his hand at Paris, and from the trailer alone I find myself looking forward to a Woody Allen film more than I have in a long time. Midnight in Paris combines three things that I’m always a sucker for: Owen Wilson rambling about things in his charming drawl, scenes of people walking around and experiencing Paris, and Rachel McAdams. Really, it feels like Woody heard that I wasn’t too interested in his movies lately and made this just to get my attention. And look at that cast, that’s nothing to sneeze at. I should also say that I found myself laughing more in this little trailer than I have during his last few full-length features put together. But that may just be because I feel pandered to. Watch the trailer below and decide for yourself where you think this one will fall in the pantheon of Woody:

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With hints of both Ryan Reynolds and James Franco’s one-man shows as well as a plot that comes achingly close to J.G. Ballard’s “Concrete Island,” the new trailer for Wrecked shows Adrien Brody with no one to act against but himself at the bottom of a ravine. Fortunately, his leg is trapped in a wrecked car, and he has no idea who he is. The trailer builds on that tension and reveals who he is, what he’s done, and which hallucinations are probably going to drive him furthest down the trail of insanity. Check it out for yourself:

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In 2004, the New England Patriots won the Super Bowl, Facebook was founded, and the United States finally lifted their decades-old travel ban against Libya. Perhaps more importantly, at Comic-Con that year, Michael Chiklis, Jessica Alba, and Ioan Gruffudd took to the stage to discuss filming their upcoming feature Fantastic Four and to present the partial cast to rabid fans who had been sifting through rumors months and months before. Now, friends, it’s time to start that process all over again. Because 2004 is such a vague memory.

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In what sounds a bit like Chalk meets Dangerous Minds meets Half Nelson, newcomer Carl Lund’s script for Detached has an absurd amount of acting talent currently stapled to its cover sheet. “Mad Men” firecracker Christina Hendricks, Lucy Liu and William Peterson (who some remember from “C.S.I.” but no one seems to remember from Young Guns 2) have signed onto a cast that already includes Adrien Brody, James Caan, Blythe Danner, Marcia Gay Harden, Bryan Cranston, and Tim Blake Nelson. Doug E. Doug is also involved – in case you had any doubts left.

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Editor’s Note: As with many of our Ten and Five articles, this article does contain spoilers. Consider yourself warned. For some, Predators may be the sequel to a beloved film catalyst that they’ve been waiting for. This may be because of how beloved the original is or how absolutely atrocious the franchise became almost instantaneously, but for whatever reason, fans seem stoked to see their favorite mandible-flexing killing machines on screen again. The film is a fun one. Unfortunately it’s marred by some of the same sort of crappy issues that plagued most mindless action films of the 1980s. Call it homage, but we had presumably moved on, grown up, and learned how to make an action movie without forcing the audience to turn their brains off. In FSR’s continued commitment to numbering everything, here’s the 5 things I enjoyed about Predators and the 10 things I didn’t.

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The new trailer for The Experiment promises to eat the weak or at least release some battery acid into your bloodstream with tension and social commentary. History and Psychology buffs will recognize the story as The Stanford Prison Experiment which saw volunteers divided into two groups to see how normal people would respond when given power over others or seeing their rights taken away. Such a fantastic premise for a film – and adding Academy favorites Adrien Brody and Forest Whitaker to the bill is a masterstroke – so why is it going straight to DVD again?

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This week, Fat Guy Kevin Carr found himself awake on a distant planet being hunted by macho Rastafarian aliens. Then he realized he was still dreaming. Sucked back into reality, he dove into the 3D experience of Despicable Me and reached for a dunce cap for Predators.

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published: 11.26.2014
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