Adam West

Batman: The Movie

You just knew that with all of FSR’s Batman coverage this week, we wanted to tackle a commentary worthy of the caped crusader’s name. Of course, we already handled Christopher Nolan’s sole DVD commentary contribution, and anything Joel Schumacher has to say has to be heard first-hand to be believed. Sure, we could have gone to Tim Burton for this one, but his track record on talking about his own movie is a big goose egg thus far. We didn’t want to chance it, so we went back, way back, to the swingin’ 60s and the POW, BLAM, and SPLAT of the colorful classic Batman: The Movie. Originally intended to be the TV series pilot, the film ended up getting a theatrical release between the series’ first and second seasons. It would continue on for three seasons total, but that classic “Batman” series would continue in the hearts of little boy wonders and batgirls all over the world for decades to come. Even now, the fandom behind this series is undeniable. Thanks to the never-ending wonders of DVD and Blu-Ray, we have this movie in all of its campy goodness. What’s more, we have Batman and Robin themselves, Adam West and Burt Ward, providing appropriately quirky commentary. Check out what they had to say right here. Holy Feature Length Amazement, Batman!

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Culture Warrior

Enduring cultural figures like Batman endure precisely because of the slight but notable changes they incur over time. Batman has had a long history in the moving image, and while the character has maintained both the central conceit of being a crime-fighting detective, the cinematic Batman of seventy years ago bears little resemblance to the Batman we’re familiar with today. The character and his myth have been interpreted with variation by a multitude of creative persons other than Bob Kane and Bill Finger. In the moving image, Batman has been embodied by a range of actors including Robert Lowery, Adam West, and George Clooney, and Batman has been realized by directors and showrunners prone to various tastes and aesthetic interpretations like William Dozier and Christopher Nolan. While Batman is perhaps best-known by a non-comic-astute mass culture through the many blockbuster feature films made about him, including this summer’s hotly anticipated The Dark Knight Rises, the character’s cinematic origins are rooted in the long-dead format of the movie serial. Batman first leapt off the page in a 15-part serial made in 1943 titled Batman and another six years later titled Batman and Robin. These serials did not influence Batman’s later cinematic iterations realized by Tim Burton and Joel Schumacher as much as they inspired Batman’s representation on television. Batman’s presence in film serials and on television have had a decisive and important impact in terms of how mass audiences perceive the Batman of feature films. At the same time, these serials […]

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Whether you’re trying to avoid the releases this week or augment them with even more movies, Your Alternate Box Office offers some options for movies that would play perfectly alongside of (or instead of) the stuff studios are shoving into the megaplex this weekend. This week features one major release that has blue naked women, a political subplot, and huge action set pieces. Avatar 2? No! It’s X-Men: First Class, and it’s a movie that demands to be double featured.

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Every day, come rain or shine or internet tubes breaking, Film School Rejects showcases a trailer from the past. Batman and Robin have an important message for you. They’re leaping off of your television set and onto the big screen where they’ll be able to spread their wings and take on the classic villains of their time. They’ll also be taking on an army of puns. Instead of a flashy trailer with scenes from the movie, Adam West grabs a microphone and tells you why you need to make a note on your calendar to see their movie. Think you know what it is? Check the trailer out for yourself:

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This is non-news, dear reader. You know it and I know it. The only people who don’t seem to know it are the other 99% of movie bloggers in the world who are treating this as if it doesn’t serve as some logical conclusion. Christopher Nolan has made it no secret that The Dark Knight Rises will be his last Batman film, a likely perfect bookend to a trilogy that has set a new standard in the world of comic adaptations. There’s no reason why his star, Christian Bale won’t retire from the franchise, as well. That said, I really wanted to write that title.

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Some people have film tastes that cater to the more obscure, auteur, artistically meritorious titles while others have tastes that lean toward the more mainstream award fodder. There are still others who have…taste at all. And then there’s me!

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Caught up in a dire financial situation, former Batman star Adam West is down on his luck. And in order to get himself back on his feet — or eating well again — he’s having a garage sale.

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Looking for the Best Batman

Robert Fure takes a look at all of the actors who have donned the cape and cowl in cinematic history. Who will emerge as the greatest of all-time? Find out here.

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Everyone remembers how vintage the original Batman show, and movie are…but what everyone forgets is how really really bad it was.

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