It was announced late Wednesday that H&M, a Swedish retail-clothing company with locations scattered about the United States, would be joining forces with costume designer Trish Summerville to create a line of clothing based on Lisbeth Salander, the goth, hacker, anti-heroine from The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo. The 30-piece line will be hitting stores on December 14th to coincide with the December 21st release of David Fincher‘s adaptation of Stieg Larsson‘s best-selling novel.

Here’s what Summerville has to say about the line, which looks to include leather jackets, tribal earrings, and ripped jeans among other “gothy” attire:

“Salander’s look is very real and very lived in, with pieces that her character has worn for a long time. My goal is for women to find pieces in it they love and then mix with their own wardrobe to create their own personal style.”

Which is all well and good, but doesn’t a clothing line based on this character kind of miss the point of the character? Never mind that Lisbeth Salander and the sure-to-be popular film will be influencing women of all ages to pierce their noses, get full-back tattoos, and cake on mascara. You have to wonder what Salander the character would think of a line based on her uniquely dark brand of dress and whether the whole idea is missing the point of her character completely.

But it’s not the first time a David Fincher film has inspired a misrepresentation of one of its characters. The I Am Jack’s Smirking Revenge account on Facebook is a testament to that – that actually hits on a couple of Fincher films, but we’re more focused on the Jack’s Smirking Revenge part, not the Facebook part. That Googling “starting a fight club” brings up roughly 28,000,000 results is a good indication of how people missed the point of Fight Club.

People see these movies. They take in these characters, they see how free and anti-establishment Lisbeth Salander and Tyler Durden are, and they nitpick what makes those characters cool or interesting to them. It becomes popularized to the point where the very nature of what made that character interesting to begin with has been buried under mounds of “style.” At least with Fight Club, it was fans of the movie missing the point. In Dragon Tattoo‘s case, it’s a multi-billion dollar a year industry trying to cash in.

According to H&M designer Anna Norling, the Dragon Tattoo line is “all about the attitude – they have a toughness to them but they are also really flattering. The collection is so much more than costume – it’s a fashion statement, it’s modern, and it’s right for now.” She also says the line, and Salander, are the “very essence of an independent woman.” One has to wonder if the independent woman would prefer to create her own hacker-goth wardrobe rather than have a store create one for her.

Anyway, the H&M line will hit Colette, a style and fashion boutique in Paris, on November 28th before going worldwide mid-December. You know, for all you fashion-forward thinkers who want to acquire the attitude early.


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