tracks-mia-driver

Director John Curran’s Tracks had solid showings at both Telluride and Venice film festivals, and with The Weinstein Company having snagged the epic Aussie adventure for US distribution rights, a theatrical drop date should be forthcoming. For now, we at least get our first look in a new trailer.

The movie is adapted from Robyn Davidson’s autobiography of the same name, telling the story of her solo trek through almost two thousand miles of Australian desert, from Alice Springs to the Indian Ocean. With only the companionship of four camels and her dog, Diggity, during her adventure she met the unique folk you’d only find making a home of the desert and also, eventually, National Geographic photographer Rick Smolan, who documented her journey. Screenwriter Marion Nelson handled screen adaptation duties.

Tracks has had a strangely long gestation period, as talks of now 47-year-old Julia Roberts portraying Davidson, who at the time of this story was 27, go back as far as 1994. The role eventually went to Stoker and Alice in Wonderland star Mia Wasikowska. Check out the trailer below, which also features Girls (and prospectively future Star Wars: Episode VII ) actor Adam Driver as Smolan.

While Davidson’s long and difficult trek was spent primarily alone, Nelson’s script spends much of its time focusing on her interactions with the Aborigines who call the Australian Outback home, farmers making a living in the harsh desert climate, journalists and tourists who ventured to get a glimpse of Davidson on her increasingly public journey and Davidson’s growing romantic relationship with Smolan.

Curran’s last directorial offering came way back in 2010, with the the Robert De Niro and Edward Norton-led Stone. He also wrote the script for Michael Winterbotton’s hyper-violent film adaptation of  Jim Thompson’s 1952 novel The Killer Inside Me starring Casey Affleck. He additionally directed the Naomi Watts-produced 2004 drama, We Don’t Live Here Anymore starring Watts, Laura Dern, and Mark Ruffalo. Tracks is Nelson’s first foray into the world of screenwriting.


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