5. The Artist (Nov 23rd)

Calling The Artist delightful would be an understatement. This is the type of film you see with your family during the holidays, but the one you don’t cringe at the idea of seeing. This is a movie for everyone. Not only is The Artist an ode to the silent film era, but it’s a great love story between a tortured artist and features one of the sweetest faces you’ll see on the big screen all year, the magnetic Bérénice Bejo as Peppy Miller.

4. Melancholia (Nov 18th)

Awkward, dark, funny, beautiful, and raw — yep, sounds like another Lars von Trier film. Melancholia has been available on VOD for around a month now, but this is an apocalyptic drama to experience on the big screen with a large audience. It’s not as challenging or as horrifying as Antichrist, just in case you’re expecting something along those lines, but it’s another triumph for von Trier. Plus, Kiefer Sutherland gives one of his best performances in a long, long time.

3. A Dangerous Method (Nov 23rd)

It’s David Cronenberg. If that doesn’t get you excited enough, it’s Croneberg not only in another reunion with Viggo Mortensen but pairing up with every nerd’s man crush, and more importantly one of the best actors working today, Michael Fassbender. The reviews were mixed out of Toronto, but the idea of Mortensen and Fassbender as Freud and Jung shooting the breeze for 90 or so minutes sounds wonderful.

2. Hugo (Nov 23rd)

A 3D kids movie from Martin Scorsese? Unlike most who scratched their heads at the idea, Scorsese was a fairly understandable choice to helm the adaptation. “The Invention of Hugo Cabret” is chock-full of imagination and wonder, and that type of material needs a world builder like Scorsese. The word out of the NYFF “secret” screening was that it’s a strong film and a great love letter to cinema. No surprise there.

1. The Descendants (Nov 16th)

There’s not a whole lot of filmmakers who do what Alexander Payne does so well. From the grander emotions we feel to the little things in life we enjoy or let bug us, the Sideways and About Schmidt director gets it all, and he always gets terrific ensembles to portray it with an uncomfortable and funny honesty. George Clooney‘s Matt King is another emasculated, heavily flawed, but lovable and empathetic Payne antagonist. An excellent performance from Clooney in a tremendous film.

What are you seeing this month?


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