Movie Houses of Worship

Trylon 5

The Trylon Microcinema Location: 3258 Minnehaha Ave. S., Minneapolis, MN No. of Screens: 1 Opened: July 2009 History: You can’t properly tell the story of the Trylon without pausing to remember the late, great Oak Street Cinema, an Art Deco style movie house in Minneapolis that screened classic and indie selections from around the world. The Oak Street was kind of like my first car: It was old, clunky and died an ignoble death, but it took me places I’d never been. Trylon repertory programmer Barry Kryshka takes the story from here: “A lot of the people who were instrumental in founding the Trylon were involved in the Oak Street Cinema. The big impetus was we loved the programming the Oak Street was doing, and when it stopped we wanted to continue it somewhere else, some way.” Barry and others launched the nonprofit Take-Up Productions and started showing movies in 2006 anywhere they could, whether it was in a city park or a back alley. By 2009, the group had saved up enough to buy their own permanent space, in a former art supply store. “We built out the theater and the projection booth,” says Barry. “It was a warehouse, basically.”

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violet crown cinema

“Movie Houses of Worship” is a regular feature spotlighting our favorite movie theaters around the world, those temples of cinema catering to the most religious-like film geeks. If you’d like to suggest or submit a place you regularly worship at the altar of cinema, please email our weekend editor. The Violet Crown Cinema Location: 434 West 2nd St. Austin, TX Date Opened: April 29, 2011 No. of Screens: 4 Current First-Run Titles: Her, 12 Years a Slave, August: Osage County, Inside Llewyn Davis, American Hustle

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silent movie theatre

“Movie Houses of Worship” is a regular feature spotlighting our favorite movie theaters around the world, those that are like temples of cinema catering to the most religious-like film geeks. This week, FSR and Nonfics contributor Dan Schindel chose one of his favorite theaters. If you’d like to suggest or submit a place you regularly worship at the altar of cinema, please email our weekend editor. The Cinefamily at the Silent Movie Theatre Location: 611 Fairfax Avenue, Los Angeles, CA Opened: Originally built in 1942 as the “Old Time Movies” theater by John Hampton. History: A tremendous silent film enthusiast, Hampton used the theater to exclusively showcase the old greats for decades. The theater closed in 1979 and remained shuttered until 1991, when Lawrence Austin convinced Hampton’s widow to sign ownership over to him. He rebranded the location as the Silent Movie Theater. It continued to screen only silents until 1997, when Austin was murdered by a hitman contracted by one of his coworkers. The theater was then purchased in 1999 by Charlie Lustman, who gave it a million dollar remodeling. In addition to silent film screenings, it now served as a trendy venue for upscale private events. The Cinefamily as we know it was born when brothers Dan and Sammy Harkham and Cinefile Video founder Hadrian Belove bought the Silent Movie Theater from Lustman in 2006. The theater is now a nonprofit, supported by sponsors and those who sign up to be members. No. of Screens: 1 Current First-Run Titles: The Act of […]

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del mar theatre mhow

“Movie Houses of Worship” is a regular feature spotlighting our favorite movie theaters around the world, those that are like temples of cinema catering to the most religious-like film geeks. This week, FSR’s own Samantha Wilson chose one of her favorite theaters. If you’d like to suggest or submit a place you regularly worship at the altar of cinema, please email our weekend editor. The Del Mar Theatre Location: 1124 Pacific Ave, Santa Cruz, CA Opened: August 14, 1936 No. of Screens: 3 Current First Run Titles: Rush and Thanks For Sharing 

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aero

“Movie Houses of Worship” is a regular feature spotlighting our favorite movie theaters around the world, those that are like temples of cinema catering to the most religious-like film geeks. This week, FSR’s Allison Loring chose one of her favorite theaters in Los Angeles. If you’d like to suggest or submit a place you regularly worship at the altar of cinema, please email our weekend editor. Aero Theater Location: 1328 Montana Avenue, Santa Monica, CA Opened: Originally opened in 1939 as a 24-hour theater for aircraft workers, but closed in 2003 after Robert Redford’s Sundance Cinemas project (which was going to take over ownership of the theater) fell through because General Cinemas (which was being sold to AMC) went bankrupt. The Aero is now officially known as the “Max Palevsky Aero Theater” thanks to Palevsky’s funding for the American Cinematheque’s refurbishment of the theater which re-opened in January 2005. No. of Screens: 1 Current First-Run Titles: Prisoners Repertory Programming: The Aero always has special series going on – this month includes “Classics from the Cohen Film Collection” starting with Intolerance,“Satyajit Ray Restored” screening a slew of the filmmaker’s films including Charulata, The Music Room, The Big City, The Expedition, The Goddess, The Hero, The Coward, The Holy Man, The Adventures of Goopy and Bagha, and The Elephant God, and “Pure and Impure: The Films of Pier Paolo Pasolini” showing Accattone, Mamma Roma, The Decameron, Salò, or the 120 Days of Sodom, and The Gospel According to St. Matthew. Special Events: Jon Favreau is a regular at the Aero (since it is his neighborhood theater) and almost […]

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IU-Cinema-Drama-Theatre-a3

“Movie Houses of Worship” is a regular feature spotlighting our favorite movie theaters around the world, those temples of cinema catering to the most religious-like film geeks. If you’d like to suggest or submit a place you regularly worship at the altar of cinema, please email our weekend editor. The Indiana University Cinema Location: 1213 East 7th St. Bloomington, IN Date Opened: January 13, 2011 No. of Screens: 1 Current first-run titles: Only God Forgives. This weekend, the cinema devoted itself to a retrospective of the work of director Nicolas Winding Refn, who was present for several introductions, conversations, Q&As and (of course) his latest Gosling-fest. Repertory Programming: Filling out the rest of the Refn series were screenings of Bronson, Valhalla Rising and Drive, all presented on 35mm prints. And in a shrewd programming move during a weekend that hosted a director known for his love of B-movies and schlock cinema, this weekend launched the Cinema’s annual Midnight series with H. Tjut Djalil’s trash-terpiece Lady Terminator. Sunday began another director retrospective focused on the work of independent filmmaker and distributor Ava DuVernay, beginning with the Jamaican crime drama Better Mus’ Come and DuVernay’s own hip-hop documentary This is the Life. The DuVernay screenings continue throughout the week at the IU Cinema and the campus’s Black Film Center Archive.

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capitol ofs

“Movie Houses of Worship” is a regular feature spotlighting our favorite movie theaters around the world, those that are like temples of cinema catering to the most religious-like film geeks. This week, we look at a theater in need at the suggestion of one of its volunteers. If you’d like to suggest or submit a place you regularly worship at the altar of cinema, please email our weekend editor. The Capitol Theater (and the Olympia Film Society) Location: 206 5th Avenue SE, Olympia, WA Opened: October 7, 1924 (home to OFS since 1986, owned by OFS since 2008) No. of screens: 1 Current first-run titles: Much Ado About Nothing and Hannah Arendt

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encinitas la paloma

“Movie Houses of Worship” is a regular feature spotlighting our favorite movie theaters around the world, those that are like temples of cinema catering to the most religious-like film geeks. This week, we have an entry from our new newswriter Samantha Wilson. If you’d like to suggest or submit a place you regularly worship at the altar of cinema, please email our weekend editor. La Paloma Theatre Location: 471 South Coast Highway 101, Encinitas, CA Opened: February 11, 1928 No. of screens: 1 Current first-run titles: The charm of La Paloma comes in the fact that you never quite know what’s going to be featured in a given week at the theater. With one screen available, there’s a semblance of a schedule drawn up: there’s always a somewhat obscure first-run showing (currently Mud), and a big name usually sneaks its way in – right now it’s The Lone Ranger.

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DSCN6491

“Movie Houses of Worship” is a regular feature spotlighting our favorite movie theaters around the world, those that are like temples of cinema catering to the most religious-like film geeks. This week, we have an entry from our new newswriter Adam Belloto. If you’d like to suggest or submit a place you regularly worship at the altar of cinema, please email our weekend editor. The Byrd Theatre Location: 2908 W Cary St,  Richmond, VA Opened: December 24, 1928 No. of screens: 1 Current first-run titles: 0 (just second runs here)

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MoMI2

“Movie Houses of Worship” is a regular feature spotlighting our favorite movie theaters around the world, those that are like temples of cinema catering to the most religious-like film geeks. This week, we have an entry suggestion from filmmaker Justin K. Staley. If you’d like to suggest or submit a place you regularly worship at the altar of cinema, please email our weekend editor. Museum of the Moving Image Location: 35th Avenue at 36th Street, Astoria, Queens, New York City Opened: September 10, 1988 No. of screens: 2 (not including wall space used during exhibitions and installations) Current first-run titles: none, but there is a preview screening and discussion of Fruitvale Station this Thursday

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ritz thomaston

“Movie Houses of Worship” is a regular feature spotlighting our favorite movie theaters around the world, those that are like temples of cinema catering to the most religious-like film geeks. This week, we highlight one theater that is in desperate need of saving. If you’d like to suggest or submit a place you regularly worship at the altar of cinema, please email our weekend editor. Ritz Theatre Location: 114 S. Church Street, Thomaston, GA Opened: March 13, 1927 No. of screens: 1 Current first-run titles: Monsters University (The Lone Ranger replaces it on Wednesday) Somehow this column has become focused more and more on cinemas in need or already going out of business. It’s not that surprising, as independent movie theaters have long been struggling and now Hollywood’s abandonment of film prints is the last straw for a lot of movie houses. Fortunately there are crowdfunding sites to bring awareness to and donations from local communities that don’t want their historic venues to close. This week I’m showcasing a small town operation that I’ve personally never been to called the Ritz Theatre and Cafe. Located in Thomaston, GA, the place needs a full digital conversion costing $75,000.

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Arena Grand movie theater

Movie Houses of Worship is a regular feature spotlighting our favorite movie theaters around the world, those that are like temples of cinema catering to the most religious-like film geeks. If you’d like to suggest or submit a place you regularly worship at the altar of cinema, please email our weekend editor. Arena Grand Theater Location: 175 W Nationwide Blvd Columbus, OH 43215 Opened: 2002 Closed: May 27, 2013 No. of screens: 5 (if memory serves) Current first-run titles: none

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Central_Park_Theater_(House_of_Prayer_Church_of_God_In_Christ)

“Movie Houses of Worship” is a regular feature spotlighting our favorite movie theaters around the world, those that are like temples of cinema catering to the most religious-like film geeks. This week, we highlight one theater that is actually a church. If you’d like to suggest or submit a place you regularly worship at the altar of cinema, please email our weekend editor. Central Park Theatre Location: 3535 W. Roosevelt Road, Chicago, IL Opened: October 27, 1917 (reopened as a church in 1971) No. of screens: 1 Current first-run titles: none

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Photo by Steve Boland (SFCityscape on Flickr)

“Movie Houses of Worship” is a regular feature spotlighting our favorite movie theaters around the world, those that are like temples of cinema catering to the most religious-like film geeks. This week, I’ve chosen one of my own favorite theaters, or at least the return of an old favorite. If you’d like to suggest or submit a place you regularly worship at the altar of cinema, please email our weekend editor. The New Parkway Location: 474 24th Street, Oakland, CA Opened: November 30, 2012 (original Parkway Theater existed at another location from January 1997 through March 2009) No. of screens: 2 Current first-run titles: Trance; Olympus Has Fallen; Disconnect

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photo-main

“Movie Houses of Worship” is a regular feature spotlighting our favorite movie theaters around the world, those that are like temples of cinema catering to the most religious-like film geeks. This week, we highlight six businesses in need of financial assistance. If you’d like to suggest or submit a place you regularly worship at the altar of cinema, please email our weekend editor. What do the six movie theaters listed in the headline have in common? Besides being six places I’ve never personally been to, they’re all businesses currently campaigning on Kickstarter to raise money for digital projectors. With Hollywood’s plan to completely cease film print distribution this year, many independent movie houses are trying not to become extinct as well. But most can’t afford the transition to digital and must crowd-fund for the costs (read a nice L.A. Times story on this nationwide issue here). So, here’s a little highlight of each cinema, what’s apparently so great about it and the status of its fundraising goal.

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Tribeca Film Festival

The Tribeca Film Festival seems to be in a constant state of figuring out its identity. It’s only ten years old, so that’s understandable. Yet while it tries to solidify its place on the international film festival circuit by tinkering with its selection of films, it’s also got the intriguing problem of situating itself in New York City. How do you cement your identity in a city that is constantly shifting around you? And, perhaps more importantly, how do you find a physical home for your festival on an island overflowing with movie theaters?

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ebert cinemas

“Movie Houses of Worship” is a regular feature spotlighting our favorite movie theaters around the world, those that are like temples of cinema catering to the most religious-like film geeks. This week, we highlight the important theaters in Roger Ebert‘s life. If you’d like to suggest or submit a place you regularly worship at the altar of cinema, please email our weekend editor. The Art Theatre Location: 126 W. Church Street, Champaign, IL Opened: November 12, 1913, as The Park Theatre. Reopened as The Art on October 3, 1958. No. of screens: 1 Why Ebert worshipped here: “I learned about the art of film [here]…The atmosphere of the Art reflected the new beatnik culture of the ’50s, and to walk through the doors was like breathing the air of freedom. There wasn’t any popcorn for sale, but the coffee was free, black, and strong, and at the age of 16, sitting in the dark wired on caffeine and trying to puzzle through Ingmar Bergman’s Through a Glass Darkly, I felt I was on the brink of amazing discoveries about the world, life, and myself…I remember those movies at the Art so vividly. The posters outside, with their stark surrealistic images and bizarre typography. The earnest bohemians in the lobby, sipping their coffee and talking like the captions on ‘New Yorker’ cartoons. The notion that in a movie you had never heard of you could discover truths you had never dreamed.” [Entertainment Weekly, 1991] “At a time when the exhibition of art and independent films is in jeopardy, the […]

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Outside 92Y Tribeca.

“Movie Houses of Worship” is a regular feature spotlighting our favorite movie theaters around the world, those that are like temples of cinema catering to the most religious-like film geeks. This week, we highlight an NYC favorite that is sadly being shut down. If you’d like to suggest or submit a place you regularly worship at the altar of cinema, please email our weekend editor. 92YTribeca Location: 200 Hudson St., New York, NY 10013 Opened: October 2008, as part of a new performance space and satellite location for the 92nd Street Y No. of screens: 1 Current first-run titles: There are no extended runs of new films, but there are many one-off premieres of new indies, as well as preview screenings. 

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therep

As you may know from our weekly Movie Houses of Worship feature, we love to celebrate cinemas and the act of seeing films on the big screen. Part of that column focuses on these favorite theaters’ repertory programming. Most of the businesses and non-profit organizations we showcase play classic films, some of them solely doing so. And that’s because so many of us like to see these oldies on the big screen and with fellow cinephiles — even titles we own on Blu-ray and/or have seen a million times. We hate to see any of these cinemas close down (see tomorrow’s MHoW), and we love to see communities band together to save and re-open local theaters, both for the preservation of the history and the continued experiences that shall happen there. Fans of the feature and hopefully other readers will be interested in a new documentary titled The Rep. It’s about those independent repertory houses and the struggle they deal with in order to keep the pastime of moviegoing alive. In addition to theater owners and patrons (mostly those of the Toronto Underground Cinema), the film features interviews with Kevin Smith, John Waters, George Romero and Edgar Wright. Following a world premiere last fall at the Austin Film Festival, The Rep is now ready for a theatrical release. And its distribution plan is quite uncommon: filmmaker Morgan White is offering the doc to any movie theater interested in booking it free of charge.

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BrattleTheatreC

“Movie Houses of Worship” is a regular feature spotlighting our favorite movie theaters around the world, those that are like temples of cinema catering to the most religious-like film geeks. This week, we highlight one of Beantown’s best in honor of St. Patrick’s Day. If you’d like to suggest or submit a place you regularly worship at the altar of cinema, please email our weekend editor. The Brattle Theatre Location: 40 Brattle St. Harvard Square, Cambridge, MA Opened: January 27, 1890, as a theater for the Cambridge Social Union. In 1953, the Brattle became a rear-projection movie house started by future Janus Films founders Bryant Haliday and Cyrus Harvey Jr. No. of screens: 1 Current first-run titles: The ABCs of Death. A preview of Upstream Color is screening on Tuesday ahead of next month’s official engagement of the film.

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published: 12.23.2014
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