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Bluebird film

A few days ago, I happened to walk past a small school bus in Manhattan. It was parked on a quiet, shady street, in front of a brick-built public school. On its back window, a small sign declared “THIS BUS HAS BEEN CHECKED FOR SLEEPING CHILDREN.” If you know anything about Lance Edmands‘ debut film, Bluebird, you’ll understand why this kind of sign (and the kind of practice it’s meant to encourage) is so necessary. You might also find yourself getting sniffly while looking at a random school bus in the middle of the day, but that’s something for later. Edmands’ film is set in snowy and desolate northern Maine, where a small town is rocked by the revelation that one of its beloved school bus drivers didn’t check her bus after a morning run, and all the horrifying consequences that follow from that. The drama of the film relies on the interconnectedness of its many characters, along with some stunning scenery and big moral questions that drive its narrative ever onward. The film has a stellar cast to recommend it, including Amy Morton, Louise Krause, Emily Meade, Adam Driver, Margo Martindale and John Slattery. It’s a stunner of a debut, and now it needs your help to get distributed (presumably to a theater near you, where you can cry about it in the dark). Edmands has just launched a Kickstarter for the film, aimed at helping distribute a film that has already played to plenty of enthusiastic film festival crowds.

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Don Cheadle for Miles Davis biopic

More than two years ago, we thought Don Cheadle‘s passion project, a Miles Davis biopic titled Miles Ahead, would be coming soon. Well, it’s finally about to begin shooting, and the aim is for a 2015 release. It’s not surprising that it’s taking so long. As Cheadle said when we quoted him in that old post, “This is the kind of movie the business 10 years ago may have leapt at. But now, you don’t really see movies like this.” Apparently there’s still not a lot of leaping going on, so the project has gone to the people for help. This week, the production launched a flexible crowdfunding campaign on Indiegogo with a goal of $325k, which is only the part of the budget that Cheadle isn’t putting in himself. And in only two days, they’ve made a quarter of that. Cheadle, who will be starring as the legendary musician and making his directorial debut with the film, appears in two videos so far on the campaign’s page. In the first, a normal intro and call for help, he talks about his passion for the project and why it actually makes sense that a movie about Davis should have this sort of social element. You can also see him practice a bit on the trumpet after talking about the musical involvement of Herbie Hancock and Robert Glasper and a soundtrack comprised of modern artists such as (possibly) Jay-Z, Skrillex, Kendrick Lamar, Dr. Dre and Nas. In the second video, posted today as […]

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Sean Astin in Sultana

30 years ago, it was “Goonies never say die!” 20 years ago, it was “Cheer, cheer for Old Notre Dame!” And 10 years ago, it was “There’s some good in this world, and it’s worth fighting for!” Now, Sean Astin has a new rally cry for us: “Remember the Sultana!” That phrase goes with a documentary in the works called Sultana, and the actor is an executive producer on the project. It’s mostly the passion of Astin’s longtime friend, producer Mark Marshall, who he met on the set of The Goonies. But the two of them are united on screen promoting the film in the campaign video for a crowdfunding venture launched last month. It’s at Kickstarter, where their goal is $75k to go towards filming and post-production costs. “Voiceover Talent” is apparently a large part of that pie, which might in part mean for Astin himself. He’s set to narrate the history doc. But there are other voice actors involved, such as Deadwood‘s Jim Beaver, American Pie‘s Thomas Ian Nichols and Free Willy‘s Jason Richter. Mostly former child actors apparently. You likely don’t know the story of the SS Sultana. That’s basically the reason Marshall is so intent on telling it and why Astin says it has to be told and remembered. The Sultana was a steamboat that blew up and sank into the Mississippi River near Memphis at the end of the Civil War. About 1800 people died in the incident, known as the greatest maritime disaster in U.S. history. Those passengers […]

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Elstree 1976 Rebel

I think it was Andy Warhol who said that everyone associated with Star Wars will be world-famous for 15 trillion minutes. Maybe I made that up, and maybe I have a personal reason for knowing it’s not necessarily true of everyone associated with George Lucas’s game-changing movie, but it does at least seem that Star Wars mania allows for anyone involved in the first or any subsequent installment to be an icon of sorts for the millions of fans out there. Even Jake Lloyd and Ahmed Best are embraced by many at conventions. And according to a new documentary in the works, plenty of extras can show up to events and have a line of people waiting to get their autograph. Of course, almost every extra appearing on screen in the original Star Wars movie plays a character with a name and maybe even an action figure. Very few are recognizable by name and most aren’t recognizable by face given that they wore masks. Plenty played roles as distinct as Greedo and Biggs and Boba Fett, while others played stormtroopers. Jon Spira‘s Elstreet 1976 will spotlight ten of these minor yet significant players, including David Prowse, whose role as Darth Vader in every way except for voice and final reveal barely counts as being labeled “extra.” There’s also John Chapman, who played a Rebel pilot in the Battle of Yavin. We can thank him for inspiring Spira (Anyone Can Play Guitar) after enrolling in the filmmaker’s screenwriting class.

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Unlocking the Cage Chimpanzee

As one of the pioneers of the Direct Cinema movement back in the 1960s, D.A. Pennebaker has long been associated with mostly observational films and concert docs, including the classics Don’t Look Back, The War Room, Monterey Pop, Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders of Mars, Town Bloody Hall and Company: Original Cast Album. Neither he nor his wife and filmmaking partner, Chris Hegedus, are thought of as directors of issue films. Their next feature, therefore, seems like a departure, though it probably isn’t as behind a cause as it sounds. The doc is called Unlocking the Cage and it follows attorney Steve Wise in his attempt to give animals the same legal rights as humans. Chimpanzees are the main focus, having been involved in his landmark lawsuit demanding personhood for the apes, one of which was a plaintiff in court last December. In their campaign video on Kickstarter, where they’re hoping to raise at least $75K to continue production, Pennebaker and Hegedus definitely come across as being on Wise’s side, though that doesn’t mean their film will have too much of a stance on the issue. It’ll probably just be like how you can figure they were supporters of Bill Clinton while making The War Room even if that’s not explicitly illustrated on screen. The couple is clearly passionate about there being protection for the chimps and other animals, yet the project is more about the questions Wise’s efforts raise, and those on the other side of the issue will be […]

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Back to the Future Part II Documentary

Pretty soon, there’ll be a whole genre of documentaries just about or related to Back to the Future. Among the fandom-based projects that show up on crowdfunding sites, Robert Zemeckis’s time travel trilogy seems to be tied to the most. There are the successfully Kickstarter-funded DeLorean-focused films Back in Time and DeLorean: Living the Dream, and there are the less successful, such as the Indiegogo-hosted The Time Machinists. I’m sure I’ve spotted more out there, and yet we haven’t seen any show up as finished and released yet. Maybe they’re all waiting for 2015? The latest, titled Back to the Future Again,is also aiming for next year, specifically because it’s about the technology “promised” for 2015 by Back to the Future Part II. This one is on Kickstarter with a goal of £403,160 ($675,365.73), which is the highest amount for this lot. More than half of that budget, though, goes directly to licensing clips and music from the movie in order to properly illustrate their comparison of what 2015 is supposed to look like, based on the movie’s estimation, and what it actually looks like. The rest goes toward making the doc itself, which will explore how far off we are from BTTF2‘s technology. When will we have flying cars and and self-lacing sneakers and hoverboards and hydrators, etc.? Back to the Future Again will also tackle the culture of the movie’s 2015, too, by talking to fashion designers about not just the science behind Marty Jr.’s footwear and clothes but also […]

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Sharknado

I wonder what kind of movie will have to show up on a crowdfunding site for the whole world to just give up. Not just give up on the crowdfunding concept, but give up on life, on everything. We got over the Veronica Mars and the Zach Braff and the Spike Lee, but how about this now: Sharknado 2: The Second One is raising money from its poor fans. Don’t worry if you’re one of them; the NYC-set movie is still set to debut on SyFy on July 30th for your snark-Tweeting amusement. It’s not looking to build its budget or anything. It just needs an extra $50K for a single extra secret scene, one we’re only told involves chainsaws. Let me guess: they want to top the first movie’s chainsaw scene. This time will both Ian Ziering and Tara Reid be engulfed and then buzz their way out? The only thing that might really be better is if this time the shark is wielding the chainsaw and he enters and then cuts open a human. A really fat human, I suppose. That’s the best they could do to make me watch, the one scene anyway, but I wouldn’t pay a cent in order to see that. I mean, other than sit through the commercials that are there to pay for SyFy’s programming, which I pay for in the form of my suffering.

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little feet panda head

“I am positive that if my mentor John Cassevetes were around today he would use Kickstarter to make his films.” Whether Alexandre Rockwell‘s statement about Cassavetes is true or not (we’ll never know), it hardly seems implausible as we see yet another indie film legend going the crowdfunding route. It’s been a long time since Rockwell was a significant name in cinema, but he’ll always be remembered as an important member of the Sundance class of ’92, his quirky black and white feature In the Soup winning the grand jury prize that year over strong contenders like Quentin Tarantino’s Reservoir Dogs and Allison Anders’s Gas, Food Lodging. He then came up with the idea for the anthology feature Four Rooms, on which he collaborated with Tarantino, Anders and Robert Rodriguez. More recently, he directed the Peter Dinklage comedy Pete Smalls Is Dead. His latest project, which is on Kickstarter with a goal of $35K is titled Little Feet, and boy does it look adorable. It stars Rockwell’s young children, Lana and Nico (both with second wife Karyn Parsons, star of The Fresh Prince of Bel Air) and was even co-written by 8-year-old Lana. Unlike some films in which the director co-writes with his kids (Rodriguez’s The Adventures of Sharkboy and Lava Girl; Francis Ford Coppola’s Life Without Zoe), this one is not at all terrible, according to reviews and awards its received already. That’s right, Little Feet is already complete and has been seen, but it needs some post-production costs taken […]

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Drip Documentary 1

Competition documentaries are best when they’re about very difficult challenges, contests that you might like to enter but never would win. Examples may include spelling bees and hardcore crossword puzzle championships or particularly skill-based events for dancers, pastry chefs and teen magicians. They shouldn’t be about people who like to put jigsaw puzzles together or play Monopoly, especially if there’s no drama involved. But you never know what’s going to be worthy of an exciting film, and the next riveting comp-doc could very well be about guys who make coffee drinks. Or, to call them by their fancy professional name: baristas. Is there really that much of an art to using an espresso machine? After all, millions of people of all ages and intelligence levels can work behind the counter at a Starbucks. Well, it turns out there’s an event called the World Barista Championships. And to get there, you have to advance through regional and national levels. It’s that big a deal. Yet it’s not even well known enough to have been the initial focus for a new documentary titled Drip, which began life as a look at L.A.’s coffee scene and then fell into a chronicle of 2013′s competition circuit. That sounds like a good way for it to have happened. Comp-docs are best when focused on interesting characters, and it sounds like this one had its subjects in place before it had its premise. I can only imagine the best baristas in the land are fascinating oddballs.

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brian huskey in a better you

Now that the Veronica Mars movie has come out, we need a new star-studded crowdfund project to anticipate and maybe get mad at. How about the latest from Matt Walsh? He was sort of in a movie with Kristen Bell recently (unfortunately it was Movie 43, and they didn’t appear in the same segment), but you probably know him best as one of the regulars of HBO’s VEEP, in which he plays the vice president’s director of communications. Or maybe as a co-founder of the Upright Citizens Brigade. His project is called A Better You and it’s on Indiegogo rather than Kickstarter. The goal he’s set up is for the nice round number of $52,650, that’s all for post-production costs. And you’ve got a month to put your money where your love for improvisational comedy is. Never mind that you can see Walsh for free (via your Mom’s HBO GO account) in two weeks when VEEP returns for its third season. Never mind that Walsh’s last improv movie, 2011′s High Road, has a disappointingly low user rating (maybe it’s that bad; I haven’t seen it). Never mind that you think Walsh should be using his own money instead of blowing it all on champagne and tropical vacations (he claims that’s not where his money goes and blames his kids for why he can’t fund this himself). And never mind that you now dislike Walsh because he blames his kids for his problems. For only $20,000, you can get him and […]

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Fort Tilden 2

Is it possible to make an independent film about young women in Brooklyn without comparison to Girls? It doesn’t appear so, and I’m not going to pretend I’m not guilty of doing so myself with the angle of this post. But I can’t respond to the unfortunate laziness to which we use Lena Dunham’s show as a reference point without as much. Now it’s not always just Girls; the acclaimed Frances Ha — itself initially likened to Girls — has joined the show as an easy measure and descriptor for any subsequent work focused on 20-something females in a certain part of New York City. It happened during Sundance with Obvious Child, and now ahead of its SXSW premiere, it’s already happening to Sarah-Violet Bliss and Charles Rogers‘s Fort Tilden. Both films deserve better simply for the fact that they’re their own entities. Not that it’s uncommon to use old movies as reference to sell new ones, especially for festival crowds. In fact, Bliss and Rogers are specifically citing Ferris Bueller’s Day Off and Romy and Michelle’s High School Reunion as being similar predecessors to Fort Tilden. Having only seen some clips and their Kickstarter campaign teaser, it reminds me of Quick Change in the way it’s about people just trying to get across Brooklyn and Queens to a destination that shouldn’t be too hard to reach. And as a huge fan of that movie and really any kind of New York City Odyssey film (After Hours is another good one), […]

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inspector chronicle prequel

Once upon a time there was a TV show called Community. No, wait, first upon a time there was a TV show called Doctor Who. Then the show Community paid tribute to Doctor Who with a parody version called Inspector Spacetime. Fans liked it so much that they helped in the creation of a web series of Inspector Spacetime. Except NBC and Sony weren’t okay with that, so the series was renamed Untitled Web Series About a Space Traveler Who Can Also Travel Through Time. Lasting six short episodes and starring original Inspector Spacetime portrayer Travis Richey, the web series was very popular and also quite acclaimed. So, logically a second season was planned, and it was going to be even bigger. A prequel episode was released last September with newly added cast members Mayim Bialik (Blossom; The Big Bang Theory), as the voice of the Inspector’s telephone-booth time machine, and Robert Picardo, who I know best from Joe Dante movies and The Wonder Years but who you may know best from Star Trek: Voyager, where he played The Doctor. Speaking of people named The Doctor, since then an actual Doctor Who Doctor, Sylvester McCoy (also of the Hobbit movies), has joined the cast. So has Chase Masterson, of Star Trek: Deep Space Nine and a couple episodes of the Doctor Who audio drama. And now there will no longer be a second season of the series. There will be a feature-length movie instead. And it is titled The Inspector […]

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toonocalypse

If short films are the new calling card for Hollywood hopefuls, then I’d like to jump the gun a bit and draw everyone’s attention to Toonocalypse. It doesn’t exist yet, but when it does it’ll be a Scottish sci-fi short, live-action mixed with animation, probably around 15 minutes in length, about cute, two-dimensional cartoon aliens who land on Earth. The pitch is that it’s Cloverfield meets Who Framed Roger Rabbit?, and I’m thinking that Gremlins and District 9 are relevant to the plot, as well. The film follows these toons’ acceptance by and entry into society followed by a revelation, one year later, that they’re not as adorable and peaceful as they seemed. It’s all shown through the lens of a student’s camera as he documents the events. Yeah, found footage and documentary-style movies are becoming tired, but we occasionally see something worthwhile in the format, like Chronicle. I don’t know that every genre and subgenre needs its own found footage entry, but the Gremlins/Critters/Attack the Block type seems like a good fit. If E.T. was made now, Elliot would have a camera phone in the iconic extraterrestrial’s face immediately. So, I give writer/director Owen Rixon some credit and a break for coming up with this idea that is somewhat unoriginal yet something I really want to watch.

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heart machine still

Nearly a year ago, I devoted the Fund This Film column to an indie feature called Funny Bunny in part because it was to star Kate Lyn Sheil, one of the most interesting young actresses working today. You should know her from such movies as The Comedy, The Color Wheel, V/H/S, Sun Don’t Shine, Somebody Up There Likes Me and maybe Listen Up Philip if you were at Sundance this year. Unfortunately, she had to drop out of Funny Bunny (which was funded and then made, and we’re still looking forward to it), and now here I am to spotlight another Kickstarter project with Sheil’s name attached. I can guarantee she’ll be in this one, as it’s already been shot and is set to debut in competition at SXSW next month. It’s called The Heart Machine. Co-starring with Sheil in this romance thriller is Short Term 12‘s John Gallagher, Jr. They play a couple who falls in love via the Internet, without ever meeting in person because they’re separated by the Atlantic Ocean. He’s in New York City and she’s in Berlin. Or maybe she’s not? Like a dark indie dramatization of a Catfish episode, there’s possibly some serious lies at the base of this relationship, and Gallagher’s character apparently becomes obsessed with investigating whether or not his online girlfriend has been in New York City the whole time. I find it appropriate — or maybe it’s ironic? — that a movie about not knowing what you’re getting on the […]

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30DaysRiffLife-Day4-MST3K-01

What is movie riffing? It’s the practice of talking back to a movie with witty remarks, usually to lampoon or criticize (and in a way, celebrate) something of low or cheap quality. The best way to define the term is to just present, as Exhibit A, Mystery Science Theater 3000. The long-running TV show, which began as a local Minneapolis program and went on to cult popularity on Comedy Central then the Sci-Fi Channel, popularized if not originated the concept of watching a bad film through the viewership of a couple of funny characters who make fun of that film. As MST3K writer/producer/director/voice of Tom Servo Kevin Murphy points out in his introduction to the book In the Peanut Gallery with Mystery Science Theater 3000, this sort of riffing goes all the way back at least to Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream, namely the scene in which the Athenians vocally ridicule the actors performing Pyramus and Thisbe. He also references Mel Brooks’s Oscar-winning 1963 short The Critic as being a precursor to the MST3K show. Hopefully that background and influence will be explored in a new documentary in the works titled RiffLife: An Exploration of the Movie Riffing Phenomenon. So far, it seems the film is going to be starting from MST3K and moving forward, not backward, to show the legacy of the program with unofficial spin-offs like Cinematic Titanic and RiffTrax, each of which is hosted by one of the main MST3K riffers, and many amateur endeavors, including at […]

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foxy merkins 2

“Oh, it’s a merkin salesman!” “What’s a merkin?” “It’s a toupée for your vagina.” Writer/director Madeleine Olnek has a gift for titles. The Foxy Merkins is her newest, a moniker just as ridiculous but more succinct than that of her last film, Codependent Lesbian Space Alien Seeks Same. It’s a buddy comedy about lesbian hookers in New York, starring Lisa Haas and Jackie Monahan, who also co-wrote the film. The synopsis invokes “bargain-hunting housewives” and “double-dealing conservative women” among their clients, both of which promise a certain degree of hilarity. Jo (Monahan) is the more experienced of the two, and resolutely identifies as heterosexual. Margaret (Haas) is the newbie, down on her luck and looking for cash. If this sounds a bit like Midnight Cowboy, that’s because it’s likely a satire, at least in part. Space Alien, which also starred both Monahan and Haas, was an irreverent send-up of old science fiction B-movies, complete with dirt-cheap sets and entirely unbelievable flying saucers. There’s a wonderful sense of love and wit in Olnek’s brand of spoof, which was recognized by IFP as one of 2011′s best undistributed films and part of that year’s Best Film Not Playing at a Theater Near You series. Its comedy is as understated as its production, which planted its absurdly dressed bald-headed lesbian aliens in diners and gay bars around Manhattan. The ensuing awkwardness, both in dialogue and visual juxtaposition, make it one of the most interesting indie comedies of the last few years. And you can rent it on […]

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loving vincent 1

This could be the most ingenious mix of animation and the documentary style since Nick Park’s Creature Comforts. Is it technically a documentary? I don’t know, but I’m calling it one for now. “Mockumentary” doesn’t seem to fit, and anyway the film will be dealing with a genuine investigation into the circumstances of Vincent Van Gogh‘s death. The expert talking heads here are from long ago. They are the people whose portraits were famously painted by the artist (including Postman Joseph Roulin and Adeline Ravoux), and their testimonial dialogue is based on actual letters and diaries and other artifacts telling of what they knew of him, much of which comes from his own words. There is likely some fictionalizing involved, but that’s fine. Docs aren’t always fact-exclusive. Loving Vincent is like time travel by cinema, and I’m certain it’s going to be an incredible trip. From the producers of the wonderful Oscar-winning stop-motion short Peter and the Wolf (watch it here) and directed by Dorota Kobiela (The Flying Machine), this new animated feature may be one of the most ambitious ever made. The plan is to have it completely consist of oil paintings on canvas, for every frame, the number totaling 56,800. Even with 40 painters on board it’s going to take a lot of time, though they’re hoping for a 2015 release to coincide with the 125th anniversary of Van Gogh’s suicide (or murder?), and it’s also going to take a lot of money. The latter is where you might come in, as […]

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Martin Starr Kickstarter

What is the best way to get your crowdfunding campaign showcased on Film School Rejects? Cast Martin Starr (Freaks and Geeks; Knocked Up). What’s the second best way? Make a sales video that’s clever, original, basically something unlike everything else on Kickstarter, Indiegogo, Seed & Spark and the rest of those sites. The effort for a new narrative feature called I’ll See You In My Dreams, which just launched yesterday with a goal of $60K, has done both. The film will feature Starr as a pool boy who has an affair with the main character, played by Blythe Danner — yes, still-gorgeous 70-year-old co-star of the Meet the Parents franchise and real-life mom to Gwyneth Paltrow and Jake Paltrow. That plot with that duo has me hooked enough as it is. But Starr and director Brett Haley (The New Year) have made a pitch trailer that shows none of that. Instead, their video is basically a little documentary in which a bunch of elderly folk are interviewed about “the golden years” and asked for advice to the younger generations on how to live a full life before you get there. 

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originalgangstas01

There continues to be talk of the all-women version of The Expendables, so why not an all-black version? Actually, there already kinda was one way back in 1996. Blaxploitation stars Fred Williamson (Black Caesar; Hell Up in Harlem), Pam Grier (Foxy Brown; Coffy), Jim Brown (Slaughter; The Dirty Dozen), Ron O’Neal (Super Fly) and Richard Roundtree (Shaft) and director Larry Cohen (Black Caesar; Hell Up in Harlem) came together for a movie titled Original Gangstas. It was sort of what The Expendables is all about now — nostalgia for the action movies of the ’80s and early ’90s with a round up of legendary action heroes who are now middle-aged or older — but then, it was in tribute to the African-American-focused genre of the ’70s as well as an answer to the rise of the urban crime films that broke out through the early work of John Singleton, the Hughes Brothers and Mario Van Peebles, the son of Blaxploitation legend Melvin Van Peebles. Eighteen years later, Original Gangstas is getting a sequel called Original Gangstas 2: Old School Gangstas. And it’s looking to the fans to help get it off the ground. Williamson, who is at the helm this time and also the writer of the script, has gone on Kickstarter to ask for $1.2M. That may seem like a lot, but it’s only a third of the budget of the original (which sure doesn’t look like it cost that much) and still $50K less than Spike Lee’s Kickstarter goal for […]

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Rubber_Band_Ball6775

Oscar nominee Sam Green (The Weather Underground) has a new project premiering at Sundance next month. And if you don’t see it there, chances are you might not be able to see it at all. Titled The Measure of All Things, this project is part of the Frontier section and is a live documentary. That means it’s not something you can wait for the DVD with. You definitely won’t be able to stream it on Netflix. If anything, you might be able to check it out in some major metropolitan area when Green brings it around the country. But its touring life is unknown at this point. This sort of thing always is. But maybe if more people knew about it and were excited about it and maybe even contributed to its Kickstarter campaign, stuff like this will be more likely to do get to your part of the world. What is a live documentary? It’s what it sounds like. Green appears on stage and narrates the doc while standing in front of a sort of slideshow of images and clips. There’s also a live band or orchestra performing the score. It sounds unnecessary, I know. Why not just screen the film with all three parts recorded and combined, like a normal documentary? Well, sure, but you can also just listen to music and never attend a concert. It’s a different experience having the filmmaker and musicians there. It’s a little less formal than it seems, at least that’s how […]

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