Podcast

Are you ready for a revolution in film criticism? Fat Guys at the Movies, hosted by Kevin Carr and Neil Miller, is the break that your movie-going senses have been yearning for. Sick of all the snobby critics bashing Will Ferrell? We’re here for you…

Godzilla 2014

In our shortest episode of the year, I take a minute to dissect the way gigantic things are being portrayed on screen and to consider how Godzilla is like the most recent doomsday climate change report. Plus, Jack interviews the legendary Bill Paxton who plays a pitching coach in Million Dollar Arm. They get philosophical about acting just above a whisper and going calmly over the top. Fortunately, the lurking Predator decides not to attack them in the process. You should follow Jack (@jackgi), the show (@brokenprojector), Geoff (@drgmlatulippe) and Scott (@scottmbeggs) on Twitter for more on a daily basis. Please review us on iTunes Download Episode #58 Directly Or subscribe Through iTunes

read more...

Labyrinth Movie

Come along and ride on a different kind of fantastic voyage. This week, in honor of the release of Cargill’s second novel, “Queen of the Dark Things,” we discuss our favorite cinematic examples of urban fantasy. Whether in the form of dueling immortals, vengeance-seeking grunge rockers, or the full arsenal of Jim Henson‘s creative genius, these clashes of fantasy and reality capture our imagination in so many ways and served as the inspiration for Cargill’s new book. We also spend FAR too much time talking about Gone Fishin’. You’re welcome, world. You should follow Brian (@Briguysalisbury), Cargill (@Massawyrm), and the show (@Junkfoodcinema). Download Episode #11 Directly

read more...

Don Peyote

As it turns out, it’s completely possible to spend the warmest months without seeing a single superhero or explosion, and on this week’s show, Geoff and I proclaim our excitement for the indie/non-blockbuster pics that might provide greatness this season. We’ll also talk about our all-time favorite screenplays to read. Plus, Paracinema writer Matthew Monagle is our first participant in a segment called You Have a Year and a Half to Make Us Excited About Star Wars: Episode VII. Let’s see if he persuades you. Double plus, we’ll chat with Dan Fogler about 2012 conspiracies and getting beaten up by Anne Hathaway for the trippy Don Peyote. You should follow Matthew (@labsplice), the show (@brokenprojector), Geoff (@drgmlatulippe) and Scott (@scottmbeggs) on Twitter for more on a daily basis. Please review us on iTunes Download Episode #57 Directly Or subscribe Through iTunes

read more...

Bob Hoskins in The Long Good Friday

Last week, the film world lost a giant. Often called The Cockney Cagney, Bob Hoskins was an actor who didn’t just demand your attention on screen, he grabbed you by the throat, turned you upside down, and shook you until you could only applaud. Cargill and I do our best to adequately honor this towering talent via some of our favorites of his performances. Sure, Who Framed Roger Rabbit and Hook are tremendous films, but we stick to the deep track stuff. We also explain why Hoskins would have made the perfect Wolverine. And yes, there will be discussion of Super Mario Brothers that borders on tribute. You’ve been warned. You should follow Brian (@Briguysalisbury), Cargill (@Massawyrm), and the show (@Junkfoodcinema). Download Episode #10 Directly

read more...

Storm in Days of Future Past

More genres, more stories, more women. This week we welcome on Screen Rant‘s Ben Kendrick for an omnibus discussion of the amazing, as-yet-unrealized potential for superhero movies. At what point will audiences get bored with the same rehashed stories? At what point will one superhero movie lose big to another superhero movie in a crowded summer? At what point will studios develop the guts to take real risks? The future may be sooner than we think. Plus, Geoff challenges me to a round of Interrogation Reviewification for The Amazing Spider-Man 2, asking perhaps the most difficult question this series has ever heard. You should follow Ben (@benkendrick), the show (@brokenprojector), Geoff (@drgmlatulippe) and Scott (@scottmbeggs) on Twitter for more on a daily basis. Please review us on iTunes Download Episode #56 Directly Or subscribe Through iTunes

read more...

Man on Fire Movie

It was inevitable. We had been getting along too well. But here finally in our ninth episode of Junkfood Cinema, a line in the sand has been drawn. Cargill and I engage in a comparative examination of both versions of Man on Fire. That’s right, Tony Scott‘s gritty revenge vehicle for Denzel Washington was in fact a remake. But whereas I fancy the original with Scott Glenn in the Creasy role, Cargill is more partial to the remake. Truth be told, this wasn’t much of a shootout. We both have elements of each iteration of Man on Fire that we adore, but that doesn’t stop us from taking these two versions apart piece by piece. PIECE BY PIECE! Deciding which version you prefer is between you and these films, but it’s our job to arrange the meeting, and we’re all out of bubble gum. You should follow Brian (@Briguysalisbury), Cargill (@Massawyrm), and the show (@Junkfoodcinema). Download Episode #9 Directly

read more...

Rolling Thunder

This week, Cargill and I call down the thunder. Specifically, we discuss one of our absolute favorite exploitation revenge films from the 1970s: Rolling Thunder. Written by Paul Schrader (Taxi Driver, Raging Bull) pens this incredibly subversive Vietnam War parable about a man pushed back into a life of violence when his triumphant return form a POW camp is interrupted by a thieving group of good ol’ boys/murders. Cargill and I chat about the baser satisfactions of this revenge movie, as well as the legitimately brilliant performances from William Devane and Tommy Lee Jones, and the intriguing religious allegory of the film’s intensely layered script. That, plus…you know, Sam Peckinpah-worthy shoot-outs. You should follow Brian (@Briguysalisbury), Cargill (@Massawyrm), and the show (@Junkfoodcinema). Download Episode #8 Directly

read more...

Fright Night 1985

Vampires are timeless; by their very nature immortal. Still, Hollywood has so shat the coffin with vampire movies of late that the creeping shadow on the wall no longer belongs to Nosferatu, but rather to permeating audience apathy. But there was a time, gentle viewer, when the legacy of the vampire canon found a way to integrate gloriously into the zeitgeist of a new era. That time was the 1980s. On this week’s episode, Cargill and I discuss some of our favorite vampire movies of the ’80s and examine how they incorporated the spirit of that decade into the long-running mythology of the blood-sucking undead. We won’t say this is an episode of Junkfood Cinema that you should sink your teeth into, because that’s far too obvious. That being said, you should totally sink your teeth into this episode of Junkfood Cinema. You should follow Brian (@Briguysalisbury), Cargill (@Massawyrm), and the show (@Junkfoodcinema). Download Episode #7 Directly

read more...

Transformative technology. Fips. The Marvel Model disrupting superhero movies (and how it can survive alongside perpetual reboots). The literal death of film. Megan Ellison saving movies. The sleeper hits of 2012 and a great movie year for every kind of fan. Emerging independent funding. Fans saving shows with their own money. The digital horizon. Here at the end of the year (and the end of this podcast) I’ve asked FSR associate editor Rob Hunter, Cinema Blend editor-in-chief Katey Rich, Movies.com managing editor Erik Davis and screenwriter Geoff Latulippe (Going the Distance) to talk about the things that will never be the same again in the movie world after 2012. They’ve come through with some incredibly interesting answers. Plus, your view on what’s changing and a look ahead to the future. Download Episode #156

read more...

From placing Citizen Kane in a modern, Murdoch-filled context to getting really close up with Joan of Arc, Landon Palmer and I have been re-examining the Sight & Sound Top Ten, and we’re hoping we learned something. Today, we’ll compare notes and see how the list has rewritten history for silent films, elevated “serious” work and acted as a queue-filling reminder that there are always more amazing movies to discover. Download Episode #155

read more...

Although different in style and tone, celebrating Halloween and Suspiria together is an obviously great idea after speaking with Patrick Melton and Marcus Dunstan, two horror writers who have created wicked traps for the Saw franchise, played lifeguard for Piranha 3DD and continue the terror of their own masked killer with the forthcoming The Collection. From grisly realism to stylized violence, we discuss how they both prove horror films can be beautiful and revel in Melton’s still-fierce fear of the plants outside his window. Plus, we check in with Bloody Good Horror co-host Casey Criswell to get his take on the new Evil Dead (2013) trailer. Download Episode #154

read more...

The Black List

As it says on its website, The Black List — the annual guide to the most well-liked unproduced screenplays floating around Hollywood — is responsible for over 200 scripts getting made into films. The unique project was created by Franklin Leonard, a production executive working up until recently for Overbrook Entertainment, who drops the listing every year on the second Friday in December. In the past, it’s been a useful tool for both writers who want to get their work noticed and executives who want to find something worth making. If there’s been any true critique of The Black List, it’s that it’s too insular. As Slate’s David Haglund noted in 2011, it’s a project that celebrates work that’s already made its way inside the impossibly closed circle of the Hollywood studio system. Perhaps in response to that criticism (but probably born more from a broader, higher ideal), Leonard didn’t wait until Christmas to unveil a new mission: to open the Black List to everyone. If you’re an aspiring screenwriter, The Black List is now a machine for getting your work read by the right people. For $25 a month, per script, they’ll host your work in a database where 1200+ professionals (studio and non) will be able to read it, propelled by an algorithm of ratings. Obviously, nothing like this has been tried before, but because it’s such an exciting initiative, it also demands a high level of scrutiny. To that end, Leonard has penned a lengthy piece explaining his […]

read more...

Early work from J.J. Abrams! Paul Walker speaking in a high-pitched lady voice! Jaw-ripping pranks gone wrong! After gaining incredible popularity on YouTube and making one of the best sequences in V/H/S, the gang from Radio Silence goes out on a limb to celebrate the underserved horror classic movie, Joy Ride. Can they convince you to fall in love with it? Download Episode #153

read more...

All throughout October, we’ll be hearing from horror filmmakers about their favorite scary movies. We’ve already heard from Joe Dante on The Exorcist, so we turn now to a newcomer on the horror scene. C. Robert Cargill (who some may know as Massawyrm from years of writing at Aint It Cool) is the co-writer of Sinister, which hits theaters tomorrow (10/12). In his film, Ethan Hawke plays a true crime novelist, so is it any wonder that Cargill has chosen to celebrate a horror flick with a writer at its giant, monstrous heart? You can go watch it right now online, or you can join us for a discussion of the last great John Carpenter film and best H.P. Lovecraft movie that isn’t based on anything Lovecraft wrote. Download Episode #152

read more...

Matthew Lillard Fat Kid Rules The World

Matthew Lillard was one of the iconic faces of high school life in the 1990s. His roles in Scream, SLC Punk, Hackers and She’s All That cemented that image throughout a broad base of genres. Now, he’s returned to high school for his first stint as a director. In Fat Kid Rules the World, an obese kid is brought back from the suicidal brink by punk rock music and a new friend. Lillard took the time to speak with me about the annoying passivity of film acting, what he has in common with Tyler Perry and the ten-year journey of bringing this adaptation to an audience. Check out the interview below: Download This Interview Enjoy More Reject Radio

read more...

All throughout October, we’ll be hearing from horror filmmakers about their favorite scary movies. First up is the legendary Joe Dante, whose new movie The Hole is available on DVD/Blu-ray and VOD. He’ll spread a little love to Val Lewton, talk about a movie with a very specific meaning to Catholics and explain how he makes horror work for ages 6 through 96. Download Episode #151

read more...

For our 150th episode, we decided to go back to the first show’s conversations, and we discovered something mildly depressing: that the discussions are pretty much the same. In 2012, we’re still talking about the topics of 2009; Transformers (a fourth is on the way), G.I. Joe (a delayed sequel is coming), Avatar (a dozen follow-ups will keep James Cameron busy until he retires), Marvel flicks (which have dominated) and remakes (which have not). Good thing we changed the format of the show a while back. Beyond the great repetition, reviewing the news from 3 years ago reveals a lot about the state of modern filmmaking through the lens of hindsight. Werner Herzog is a highlight, and revisiting the releases (Drag Me To Hell and Up) gives us an idea of what might actually endure. On this week’s show, we re-form the team from that pilot episode – site publisher Neil Miller and associate editor Rob Hunter – to dip ourselves in the cool waters of nostalgia and try to figure out what, if anything, is different about the movie-making landscape after 150 shows. Download Episode #150

read more...

IU Cinema

In 2010, Jon Vickers was named the first director of the Indiana University Cinema, a bold initiative to build a world-class film screening program at the university. The hiring, much like the renovation of their 1930s theater into a THX-certified modern venue, was a noted combination of reverence for cinematic history and foresight into its future. In this interview, we sit down with Vickers to take a verbal tour of the new theater, to discuss the challenges of programming in an age between film and digital, to figure out how to entice Werner Herzog to your cinema, and to share a personal love of movies. Of course, there’s also the big question: how can an art house scene thrive in a city of only 80,000? Check out the interview below: Download This Interview Enjoy More Reject Radio

read more...

Neil Berkeley‘s new documentary, Beauty is Embarrassing, invites us into the blissful insanity of Wayne White – the artist behind Pee-Wee’s Playhouse, several iconic music videos and a ton of incredible prints. Both men join me to discuss the nature of art, why it could possibly be embarrassing, and then I try to get them to say the word of the day. Download Episode #149

read more...

Is the chasm between active participation in video games and passive observation in movies too wide to cross? It’s undeniable that the major studios have stumbled a bit when it comes to adapting video games into movies, but are there lessons from the video game industry itself that producers can learn? To answer this question, we turn to movie reviewer, Wizard World managing editor, and producer of Planet of the Apps over at Machinima, Kevin Kelly. Download Episode #148

read more...
  PREVIOUS PAGE
NEXT PAGE  
Twitter button
Facebook button
Google+ button
RSS feed

published: 11.26.2014
B
published: 11.26.2014
B
published: 11.21.2014
D
published: 11.21.2014
B+


Some movie websites serve the consumer. Some serve the industry. At Film School Rejects, we serve at the pleasure of the connoisseur. We provide the best reviews, interviews and features to millions of dedicated movie fans who know what they love and love what they know. Because we, like you, simply love the art of the moving picture.
Fantastic Fest 2014
6 Filmmaking Tips: James Gunn
Got a Tip? Send it here:
editors@filmschoolrejects.com
Publisher:
Neil Miller
Managing Editor:
Scott Beggs
Associate Editors:
Rob Hunter
Kate Erbland
Christopher Campbell
All Rights Reserved © 2006-2014 Reject Media, LLC | Privacy Policy | Design & Development by Face3